Managing Shoulder pain

Talk about diets, exercise, and disease.
User avatar
mr. beefy
Adolescent Bully
Posts: 288
Joined: Sat Jan 06, 2007 11:08 pm
Location: Oakland, CA

Managing Shoulder pain

Postby mr. beefy » Tue Aug 05, 2008 3:33 pm

Here is the background:
My friend just adopted a 7-8 year old pit bull. *Awesome* dog, mellow as can be, gets along with everything and everyone (uses cats like pillows). This is my friend's first dog and he's a perfect "starter model".

The problem is that the dog has a serious limp and it's most likely arthritic in nature.

Currently the dog is overweight and has probably not been adequately exercised in years. He's on a major diet and beginning to get a waist, but the weight is certainly not helping the issue.

Right now he's going to go on serious bedrest for a week or so (which is no problem for the big, lazy guy). The problem is that exercise needs to be introduced as well as some sort of pain management system. He's already had glucosamine added to his diet but that's not going to help him deal with the pain.

Short of surgery, how does one handle arthritis in an older animal? Does anyone have a good management system so it doesn't get aggravated but the dog still gets adequate exercise?

Unfortunately it's mostly sidewalks around here, so solely walking on soft ground is not an option (the closest park is a 20 minute walk away).

Any thoughts at all would help. My friend is really committed to keeping this guy happy for the rest of his years but, as always, $ is an issue.

User avatar
lauren99
2 Legit 2 Quit Bully
Posts: 813
Joined: Mon Mar 31, 2008 4:20 pm
Location: Vacouver, BC
Contact:

Postby lauren99 » Tue Aug 05, 2008 3:47 pm

I have to say that I think its awesome your friend has an older boy and is commited to making him as comfortable as possible. I have a 3 year old pibble who has hip dysplasia. First thing I did was put him on glucosomine and another product called rejuvenate.I noticed a difference within a couple weeks. i also had him on Rymidal and tramodol (Sp?). I have since taken him off Rymidal as it caused some bleeding and i only give him tramadol when he is very stiff. I would talk to the vet for sure but would also look into natural rememdies. Hope this helps a bit!

BaltimoreBully
Adolescent Bully
Posts: 245
Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2008 7:35 pm
Location: Baltimore

Postby BaltimoreBully » Tue Aug 05, 2008 4:40 pm

Swimming is the best form of exercise for these guys. I'd say consult with a good vet and start slowly maybe 5 minutes and build up from there. As his muscle tone and fitness increase in the water walking on land will be easier for him. Jezzy has been on Deramaxx for years with no issues yet and this year we added in Tramadol as her pain got worse. Tramadol is cheap, I get it filled at the WalMart pharmacy b/c it's on their $4 list.

User avatar
lauren99
2 Legit 2 Quit Bully
Posts: 813
Joined: Mon Mar 31, 2008 4:20 pm
Location: Vacouver, BC
Contact:

Postby lauren99 » Tue Aug 05, 2008 4:47 pm

oops I forgot to add that my guy goes swimming 2 days a week. not only has the weight come off a lot faster than it would have, but his soreness has improved greatly

User avatar
elegy
Bully Ambassador
Posts: 2277
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2004 10:49 am
Location: PA
Contact:

Postby elegy » Tue Aug 05, 2008 7:57 pm

regarding the weight, have you had his thyroid level checked? hypothyroidism is pretty common in pit bulls, and it can make them gain weight and make it hard to get it off them.

a good quality glucosamine supplement will help longterm, but an nsaid is probably not out of line. talk to your vet- lots of options available- rimadyl, deramaxx, metacam, previcox....

User avatar
Nickdawg
Addicted to PBF
Posts: 7048
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2006 7:15 pm

Postby Nickdawg » Tue Aug 05, 2008 8:10 pm

I know people who have had excellent results with accupuncture and chiropractic for their dogs.

For meds my dog got Metacam (liquid anti- inflammatory) and tramadol (pain killer), he didn't have any side effects from these, can do bloodwork periodically to make sure all is ok... depends on the dog/age, quality over quantity sometimes.

and yay for your friend!

User avatar
mr. beefy
Adolescent Bully
Posts: 288
Joined: Sat Jan 06, 2007 11:08 pm
Location: Oakland, CA

Postby mr. beefy » Wed Aug 06, 2008 12:29 am

Thanks guys!

I didn't even think about hypothyroidism, since he doesn't have the traditional "bulgey eye," but now he's going to request a blood panel when he sees the vet.

So now I guess it's finding the right anti-inflammatory, right pain reliever and scout the area out for good water holes (which can be tricky in Oakland but we've been brainstorming).

Yeah, it's really sweet to see him get a second chance. And what's even sweeter is that my friend chose this guy over some real lookers when offered his choice of fosters... he's been trained well by his loudmouth responsible pit bull owning friends!

User avatar
Nickdawg
Addicted to PBF
Posts: 7048
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2006 7:15 pm

Postby Nickdawg » Wed Aug 06, 2008 12:57 am

Yeah, it's really sweet to see him get a second chance. And what's even sweeter is that my friend chose this guy over some real lookers when offered his choice of fosters... he's been trained well by his loudmouth responsible pit bull owning friends!


:thumbsup:


Return to “Health Issues”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 19 guests