WTF!!!!!!! Was 2 secs away from hurting his lil @$$!!!!!!

Talk about diets, exercise, and disease.
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kaliya5
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Postby kaliya5 » Mon Oct 20, 2008 8:27 pm

Everyone had their own lingo guys. Maybe Ruger is a horrid animal abuser... OR maybe some people have taken him too literally.

When I get mad at Ziggy (my very strong-willed terrier mix) I will say things like "Boy I will beat your ass into the ground if you don't drop that *insert thing*" and anyone hearing that would think I'm serious. BUT... my definition of "beating his ass" is getting in his face. He rolls to his side and gives his best submissive look and then as soon as I say "ok" he is right back up running around. IF getting in his face doesn't produce a submission (90% of the time that's all it takes) then I will "bite" him with my hand or pop him on the butt to let him know I am serious. That gets the message across and he apologizes (rolls) and we move on.

After all, Ziggy doesn't speak English, but he does know when my tone and my body language = :po:, so it doesn't matter to him what I say, he gets the message.

I think b/c I have been raised in the south, where hearing things like that is more common than other places, that's how I react when my canine kids misbehave. I say things all the time like "I will tan your hide!" but I don't actually do it!

I think this thread regarding hitting is an example of phrasing and misunderstanding. It sounds like Ruger was genuinely startled at his puppy's growl and said some stuff that we misinterpreted. Frankly, for a new APBT terrier it can be scary. You fear one thing can be the start of some larger issues. You read up and learn how to do things like food aggression testing and it's hard to know how often or what circumstances to do it under, how the dogs will react, what messages the dog is actually receiving, etc. and mistakes WILL be made.

I think a lot of new APBT owners with genuine questions and concerns get scared off of the forum when they ask an innocent question and get ganged on by older members for not already knowing the answer. Hell, I have wanted to ask for advice a few times here but haven't because I don't want to get yelled at for being "ignorant". I'll let someone else ask the question and get torn up for me. lol

Let's try to be supportive guys :)

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retro
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Postby retro » Mon Oct 20, 2008 10:40 pm

it seems to me that there is an propensity towards melodrama on this forum. again, there is a difference between physical correction and abuse. a balanced dog will be able to take a physical correction and learn from it, without becoming scared or 'mean.' be it a smack on the ass or a shake of the scruff - a mentally solid puppy will learn from it and move on. differentiating between discipline & physical abuse shouldn't be that difficult when utilizing common sense.

the spin on this thread reminds me of an email forward that i got titled 'School in 1957 vs 2007:'

Scenario - Jeffrey won't be still in class, disrupts other 20 students: 
1957 - Jeffrey sent to office and given a good paddling by the Principal. 
          Returns to class, sits still and does not disrupt class again. 
2007 - Jeffrey given huge doses of Ritalin. B ecomes a zombie. 
          Tested for ADD. School gets extra money from state 
          because Jeffrey has a disability. 

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Vivid
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Postby Vivid » Mon Oct 20, 2008 11:19 pm

When I get mad at Ziggy (my very strong-willed terrier mix) I will say things like "Boy I will beat your ass into the ground if you don't drop that *insert thing*" and anyone hearing that would think I'm serious. BUT... my definition of "beating his ass" is getting in his face. He rolls to his side and gives his best submissive look and then as soon as I say "ok" he is right back up running around. IF getting in his face doesn't produce a submission (90% of the time that's all it takes) then I will "bite" him with my hand or pop him on the butt to let him know I am serious. That gets the message across and he apologizes (rolls) and we move on.


I get verbal like that with my pup as well and i'm from the city.


a balanced dog will be able to take a physical correction and learn from it, without becoming scared or 'mean.' be it a smack on the ass or a shake of the scruff - a mentally solid puppy will learn from it and move on.


I agree. when ty goes and raids the kitty litter she makes alot of noise in there and sometimes when i call her name she cant hear me. So i take my pointer and middle finger and tap her on the butt.it doesnt hurt but it gets her attention. That physical correction doesnt scar her for life but it does let her know that im not happy with her doing that. Three seconds later ty is back to running around with the kids and being a pup.

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AkainePSP
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Postby AkainePSP » Sun Nov 02, 2008 2:34 pm

I have never had a problem with Lila guarding her food from me. The cats are another story and that only happened once. She was eating some canned food, my cat came over and Lila snapped at her.

What I did with her when she was a puppy is I would make her sit before she got her food, after she mastered that we graduated from just sitting to sitting and staying. She has to show me good behaviour before she can eat. One thing that I have found works for us is sitting. Lila gets nothing unless she can sit and behave herself first. This includes toys and playtime. If she wants my attention she has to sit first. Lila is 10 months old and we still do the sit and stay before eating.

I also do little things with treats like holding them in front of her and not allowing her to eat them until I tell her its ok. She's doing pretty well with this. I call it teaching Lila self control.

I am no expert in training and believe me Lila still has issues to overcome but making her sit first has really helped.

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AkainePSP
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Postby AkainePSP » Sun Nov 02, 2008 2:36 pm

retro wrote:
the spin on this thread reminds me of an email forward that i got titled 'School in 1957 vs 2007:'

Scenario - Jeffrey won't be still in class, disrupts other 20 students:
1957 - Jeffrey sent to office and given a good paddling by the Principal.
Returns to class, sits still and does not disrupt class again.
2007 - Jeffrey given huge doses of Ritalin. B ecomes a zombie.
Tested for ADD. School gets extra money from state
because Jeffrey has a disability.


I am a teachers aide in a Life Skills classroom and oh my goodness this is so true. These kids have no consequenses for anything they say or do.

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Michael
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Postby Michael » Tue Dec 09, 2008 11:11 pm

Just beat his ass with a baseball bat, he wont growl anymore :thumbsup:

albert09
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Postby albert09 » Tue Dec 09, 2008 11:37 pm

love for ba brody wrote:As already stated, do not hit your dog, aside from not being affective in solving your problem it might even worsen it if your dog views you as a threat.
Like Ketra said, feeding him by hand would be a great way to go about this.
You might also want to try adding something extra special to his food, when you come by and place your hands in the bowl. This way he will learn not only is it not bad when you come around him while he's eating, but he will be excited, because you will be giving him extra special goodies.


Oneluckygirl wrote:River will eat with another dog in his bowl and not have a problem with it


You should definitely not allow this to happen. Even with a very, sweet loving dog, a fight could arise in this type of situation.



Hennessey had her first flipout on my g/f's JRT because he got up in her food

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jazminesgranny
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Postby jazminesgranny » Wed Dec 10, 2008 8:44 am

One thing I did with a dog I had that was very aggressively guarding was take total control of the feeding.. food was given in handfuls a little at a time until gone and we continued this for sometime... then when that made progress I sat the bowl down on the floor next to me with my hand on the bowl and let him eat...then we would put the bowl down and make him sit and wait until we said he could eat.. . it was a long process but it stopped the guarding... I am no expert and there are many on here so I dont know if what I did was the right thing to do but it did work...

Debby

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Pikarya
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Postby Pikarya » Thu Dec 11, 2008 11:36 pm

"How to be a horrible owner 101" should be the thread title.

NEVER hit an animal. Thats not discipline, thats abuse and sets aggression in the dogs head later in live. If not aggression, then cowardice.

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1lila1
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Postby 1lila1 » Thu Dec 11, 2008 11:49 pm

Hand feed your dog!!! Lila went through a food and treat aggressive phase when she hit adolescence. I nipped it in the bud by hand feeding her and praising her for taking the food gently from my hand. It worked within a week or two. If you hit your dog during feeding your dog is going to associate feeding and you being near his food with negative things. You can't discipline a dog like you would a human child, they don't reason like humans do. Hitting will only create more stress, fear, and that is a recipe for aggression!! Hand feed for a while and you will see an amazing difference, I promise!!

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Kingsgurl
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Postby Kingsgurl » Fri Dec 12, 2008 1:40 am

I understand both your angry posting reaction (venting) and your desire to have a well behaved pup.
Good on you trying to get advice on an issue that can be very problematic as a dog matures.

I do the aggressive/protective eater(whatever u wanna call it) check about twice a week. I never had any problems when i put my hand near, over, or take his food while he's eating.


This tells me you are trying to be proactive and develop a dog who has no food aggression issues. When teaching/establishing this, it really IS wise to take the previous posters advise and make your hand near his bowl a POSITIVE experience (adding high value stuff when you put your hand in etc.) I never remove a dogs food without giving him something EXTRA good as a trade off when establishing this trust. In fact, during the establishment period, I don't recommend removing food at all.

Putting your hand near or in the pups food gets him used to that, yes, REMOVING his food periodically and randomly while he is in the midst of eating teaches him that sometimes you take his food.


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