Dental Cleaning tomorrow-Acepromazine and Telazol ?'s

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Cherry
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Dental Cleaning tomorrow-Acepromazine and Telazol ?'s

Postby Cherry » Mon May 18, 2009 1:40 pm

Tomorrow I have an appt scheduled for Cherry to get her very first dental cleaning. She will be 2 years old next month. This is the only dental cleaning I will get done, unless needed in the future. After they remove the tarter buildup she has now, I am going to give her raw knuckle bones weekly and brush her teeth daily.

I am always overly cautious about anyone handling my dog, especially when she goes under anesthesia. The procedure is being done at Banfield under her insurance plan. The ONLY things I let them do on Cherry is all routine vaccinations and they also did her spay no problem. I called to ask some questions about the procedure and am a bit concerned about the anesthesia they use. She said Acepromazine and/or Telazol. She is a very calm, chill dog and showed no adverse reaction to it when she got spayed but that was at 4 months old. She is APBT and American Bulldog. I was hoping for some insight on the 2 medications, either to calm me down or to warn me against them. Thanks so much in advance!

msvette2u

Postby msvette2u » Mon May 18, 2009 1:48 pm

The dog will be fine. Those are routinely used drugs in vet care.

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Cherry
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Postby Cherry » Mon May 18, 2009 1:51 pm

Thanks:) I try and do my research beforehand so I am not so worried or causing hurt to my baby! That and all the horror stories I hear about Banfield scare me. roflmao So far they've done great with her besides the usual pushing Science Diet on us.

msvette2u

Postby msvette2u » Mon May 18, 2009 1:59 pm

Pushing SD isn't going to kill the dog, even if you fed it to her lol
Of course we don't feed it or recommend it to our adopters here ;)

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Postby Cherry » Mon May 18, 2009 2:14 pm

Oh I know...they just overdo it a bit. Cherry has food, environmental and contact allergies. They told me Science Diet would just clear that all right up! roflmao I just thank them for their input but I will stick with Wellness. When I was feeding Raw, I got so many lectures and nasty looks. :tongue:

I am feeling a bit more comfortable about the procedure tomorrow, I just can't wait for it to be over with and Cherry is home with me tomorrow evening. I don't like handing her over. They all love her there though and Cherry loves them so it makes it a bit easier. :)

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Postby Adrianne » Mon May 18, 2009 2:14 pm

SD has its place in the world IMO.. i have seen several cats excel on the feed, not so much dogs but its a healthy alternative for your average pet owner to whatever they can snag at the grocery store, ya know?

Ace is a relatively fool proof drug, for all the times I have used/seen it used Ive only seen two negative reactions.

Is there a reason you're adverse to marrow and other cleaning raw meaty bones more frequently in the diet as opposed to brushing? From my experience a brush doesnt achieve the same effect a good raw meaty bone does.

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Postby Cherry » Mon May 18, 2009 2:17 pm

Oh I'm not adverse to it AT ALL and will be heading to the butcher this weekend. A long time ago, we thought she had an allergy to beef but it was just a reaction to beef in dry food/treats, not raw. She will be getting her teeth brushed regularly and raw meaty bones. I will have to introduce them slowly to her as I don't want her stomach getting upset but other than that, it will be a weekly treat.

msvette2u

Postby msvette2u » Mon May 18, 2009 2:28 pm

Your vet would not use medications he/she thought were dangerous to the dog.
It's best to trust their judgment about what they are using.
I used ace and xylazine(sp) in the field in all kinds of circumstances for the past 4-5 yrs. and have not had an adverse reaction during that time.
Even if your dog had a problem the vet would be prepared and able to handle it.
It is good to give an induction agent prior to the anesthesia - again if your vet decides one med is preferable to another, he/she will do what they feel is necessary and won't give anything unneccesarily.

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Postby Cherry » Mon May 18, 2009 2:43 pm

Thank you so much. :) I swear, I am more nervous about this stuff than Cherry. roflmao

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Postby bethh » Mon May 18, 2009 5:53 pm

My experience with ace isn't good. I have 2 dogs that tolerate it, 2 that don't. They adverse reactions we exeperienced were loud vocalizing and running into the sliding glass doors, falling, foaming at the mouth. Possibly rare reactions - I don't know. The link below is to an anesthesia primer for belgians, not pits, but it gives a very good overview of drugs used in anesthesia and this particular vet's thoughts about them.

http://www.bsca.info/health/anesthetic.html

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Postby Sally_Dog77 » Mon May 18, 2009 7:23 pm

There is a Presa breeder that says not to use ace (or some other drugs) in that breed.

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Postby Adrianne » Mon May 18, 2009 8:06 pm

Sally_Dog77 wrote:There is a Presa breeder that says not to use ace (or some other drugs) in that breed.
If its the same presa breeder I know she lost two pups cropping on ace once :-/

msvette2u

Postby msvette2u » Mon May 18, 2009 8:10 pm

Ace is a not an anesthetic. They'd have given something else too.
It is a tranquilizer, and does not have pain relief qualities to it.

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Postby Sally_Dog77 » Mon May 18, 2009 8:48 pm

Adrianne wrote:
Sally_Dog77 wrote:There is a Presa breeder that says not to use ace (or some other drugs) in that breed.
If its the same presa breeder I know she lost two pups cropping on ace once :-/


I think it might be if she is the one in IL. She is a nice lady. I've been wanting to get out and see her dogs work for a while but don't know when I'll be able.

I remember reading an article in Vet Tech magazine that suggested precautions when choosing/monitoring anesthesia for different breeds, mostly the brachycephalic (SP) ones, but I didn't see anything on Mastiff or molosser dogs.

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Postby Misskiwi67 » Mon May 18, 2009 10:57 pm

The problem with Ace is not the drug... its the dosing. Its quite common for vets to give a "hub" of ace, which is a small but unknown quantity of the drug.

There is nothing that can be done with Ace that can't be fixed with fluid therapy. Request blood pressure monitoring under anesthesia and your pup will be just fine.

I just did a working interview at a Banfield hospital and was very impressed with their anesthetic protocols. If your pup needs any extractions make sure he gets some good pain control, but otherwise that is fine.

Also remember thats just the pre-med... its not the entire anesthetic protocol. It takes the edge off while the doctors place the catheter and do other potentially scary stuff so your pup is as comfortable as possible!


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