Infinia dog food?

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Infinia dog food?

Postby nicolegrantier » Sun Oct 31, 2010 1:17 pm

So it appears that our dog has allergies…she gets dandruff and little rashy scabs/bumps all over. I have been reading about the raw diets and have been really interested in trying it but am having trouble finding good meat sources in our area. None of our local butchers deal with poultry, and we only have a few grocery stores. I was not impressed with the meat they had. The only two stores that sold the right “parts” were Safeway and Wal-Mart (we only have one other small grocery store and they have a TINY meat dept). Anyway, I really want to avoid all the crap in the meat I can get from there sources.

So in the meantime I have been feeding dry food. I just purchased a bad of Infinia brand dog food. I choose the Infinia™ ZenFood™ Salmon & Sweet Potato Recipe. The only two kinds our local feed store carries are the salmon and sweet potato and the bison and potato. I choose the salmon as it had no egg product. Not knowing what her allergies were I wanted to play it safe. The salmon and sweet potato is the only one they carry that has no eggs. I looked up the reviews for this brand online and found all the Infinia foods got 5 stars except for this one (which got 4). Anyway, here are the ingredients:

The Best Essentials
Savory, natural salmon is the #1 ingredient:
Unique natural protein for strong, lean muscles
A taste dogs love
High in Omega 3 & 6 fatty acids to help support a strong immune system, supple skin and a shiny coat
Sweet potatoes: rich in antioxidant nutrients and complex carbohydrates for optimal health
Salmon Oil & Canola Oil: provide important Omega 3 & 6 fatty acids including DHA to help support a healthy coat and strong immune system
Potatoes: rich source of natural vitamins, minerals and protein, plus wholesome natural carbohydrates for easy digestion and healthy energy
Peas: rich in complex carbohydrates, natural vitamins and wholesome fiber
Healthy Extras
Dried chicory root and yucca schidigera extract, along with dried fermentation products: work together to help support a healthy digestive system
Contains Glucosamine & Chondroitin
L-Carnitine: a key nutrient that supports healthy metabolism of fats for a strong, lean body
Calcium, Phosphorus and other minerals: help build strong bones and teeth
Recipe FREE Of:
Corn, Wheat and other Grains
Soy and Dairy Products
Chicken and Beef
Ingredients
Salmon, Menhaden fish meal* (natural source of glucosamine and chondroitin), sweet potatoes, potatoes, peas, canola oil, potato fiber, natural flavor, salmon oil (a source of DHA), salt, methionine, mixed tocopherols (a natural preservative and source of vitamin E), dried chicory root, taurine, glucosamine hydrochloride, vitamins (vitamin E supplement, thiamine mononitrate [vitamin B1], ascorbic acid, vitamin A supplement, biotin, calcium pantothenate, pyridoxine hydrochloride [vitamin B6], vitamin B12 supplement, riboflavin [vitamin B2], vitamin D3 supplement, folic acid), choline chloride, L-carnitine, yucca schidigera extract, dried Enterococcus faecium fermentation product, dried Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product, dried Lactobacillus casei fermentation product, dried Lactobacillus plantarum fermentation product, dried Trichoderma longibrachiatum fermentation extract, chondroitin sulfate, minerals (iron proteinate, zinc proteinate, copper proteinate, ferrous sulfate, zinc sulfate, copper sulfate, potassium iodide, manganese proteinate, manganous oxide, manganese sulfate, sodium selenite)
*naturally preserved with citric acid, mixed tocopherols and rosemary extract

And here is the link to there site: http://www.infiniapetfood.com/products/ ... ALMON.aspx

The only “decent”, or non-grocery store brands, sold in our town are: Science Diet, infinia, Nutro, and Solid Gold.

So what do you suggest for a dog with allergies?
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Re: Infinia dog food?

Postby AllisonPitbullLvr » Sun Oct 31, 2010 1:31 pm

If it's true allergies to food (only about 10% of dogs allergies are to food with the three main culprits being beef, chicken and wheat/corn. Eggs could be fine and are often a part of raw feeding.) I would look for a diet that has separate manufactuing lines for their foods to avoid cross contamination between protein sources. So for instance, if your dog truly does have an allergy to say, chicken, and the company isn't sterilizing their equipment between making that diet and the salmon one, your dog could still experience symptoms. It's similar to people with severe peanut reactions needing that "made in a peanut free factory" symbol.

A diet that is high in omega fatty acids is good, so a fish based diet was a good choice, but it never hurts to add in extra fish oil capsules to help support healthy skin and coat.

And keep in mind that dogs who have allergies to food almost always have some environmental allergies so you may not see complete resolution to her issues on whatever food works best for her.

The only commercial diet I am aware of that has separante manufacturing lines for their different foods is Natural Balance.
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Re: Infinia dog food?

Postby nicolegrantier » Sun Oct 31, 2010 2:31 pm

AllisonPibbleLvr wrote:If it's true allergies to food (only about 10% of dogs allergies are to food with the three main culprits being beef, chicken and wheat/corn. Eggs could be fine and are often a part of raw feeding.) I would look for a diet that has separate manufactuing lines for their foods to avoid cross contamination between protein sources. So for instance, if your dog truly does have an allergy to say, chicken, and the company isn't sterilizing their equipment between making that diet and the salmon one, your dog could still experience symptoms. It's similar to people with severe peanut reactions needing that "made in a peanut free factory" symbol.

A diet that is high in omega fatty acids is good, so a fish based diet was a good choice, but it never hurts to add in extra fish oil capsules to help support healthy skin and coat.

And keep in mind that dogs who have allergies to food almost always have some environmental allergies so you may not see complete resolution to her issues on whatever food works best for her.

The only commercial diet I am aware of that has separante manufacturing lines for their different foods is Natural Balance.


Hmm...I'll have to look into Natural Balance. I hate paying shipping on dog food considering it weighs so much though(the joys of a small town). maybe I can stock up when I'm out of town or something. So, if only 10% of dogs have food allergies than I assume the rest are environmental? I was also unaware that beef and chicken were so high on the list. I actually must admit that I never really thought about meat. Hmm...so a raw diet may not work either...Are there allergy tests for dogs? I would call my vet but she was just diagnosed with cancer and is out for a bit. I haven't really wanted to try a new one in her absence unless it's an emergency.

Just looked up Natural Balance on petco. We have a petco about 90 miles away. Maybe I could get someone to bring me back a bag next time they went...I'd really like to know exactly what she is allergic to though...
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Re: Infinia dog food?

Postby PITtsburgher » Sun Oct 31, 2010 3:56 pm

There are a lot of possibilities here:
Skin problems can be due to allergies as well as many other causes: bacterial infection, yeast infection, and demodex are other common skin problems. Once your vet is able to see you again I would recommend working through this with her; otherwise there are just so many possibilities that trying to navigate them yourself is pretty hard.

Dogs are allergic to a lot of things, just like people. Many dogs are very allergic to fleas - even just one bite - so make sure you are very vigilant with your flea protection. Many dogs are also allergic to something in their food - usually the protein source (chicken, beef, fish...). Even more dogs are allergic to something in the environment: dust, grass, pollen, cats... you name it. So just trying a different food doesn't necessarily address all the possibilities.

Generally what a vet will do is first rule out bacteria, yeast, and demodex. This can all happen during your vet visit. If the vet feels the problem is due to allergies, she will probably recommend a food trial where the dog eats a hypoallergenic food where the proteins and carbs have been cut up into tiny pieces so the dog's body cannot recognize any antigens that could cause allergies (food allergies develop over time when the dog is repeatedly exposed to a protein source or sometimes a carb source). During this food trial the dog eats a prescription food like Hills z/d or Purina HA and NOTHING else - treats contain intact protein and carb sources too and can trigger the allergies the same way the food can. A food trial usually lasts at least 8 weeks. If the dog improves, usually that means that the allergy was food-related. At that point the dog will probably get switched to a novel protein diet - meaning the protein source is something the dog has never eaten (and is thus probably not allergic to), or sometimes the dog is kept on the hypoallergenic food. If the dog does not improve during the food trial the allergies are assumed to be environmental and at that point you are looking at symptom management through medication, and - if you have the money - allergy testing. The better type of allergy testing involves having antigens injected into the dog to determine the precise cause of the allergies. Blood testing can be done too but is not very accurate. Once you know the source of the allergies you can either eliminate it from the environment if possible, or get allergy shots, or continue on the medical management of the symptoms.
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Re: Infinia dog food?

Postby doglove » Sun Oct 31, 2010 4:14 pm

The flaw with 'flea protection' is most do not repel fleas. It takes the bite to kill the flea, and then the dog has a reaction. Using a pet safe flea repellant spray would do the trick on all outdoor outings. That is, if your dog has an allergic reaction to fleas. It'd just be obnoxious if she isn't lol
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Re: Infinia dog food?

Postby FBODGRL » Sun Oct 31, 2010 6:07 pm

for fun you can search allergies in this section for tons of info too. There are a lot of dogs on this forum that have allergy problems.

As far as a raw diet(which I recently started Khan on) I have read that it also can help to improve environmental allergies as well as food allergies.

A lot of allergy issues are just a trial and error in trying to figure out what works best for your dog. They can be very frustrating!

What were you feeding before you got the new food?
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Re: Infinia dog food?

Postby AllisonPitbullLvr » Mon Nov 01, 2010 7:00 am

PITtsburgher wrote:There are a lot of possibilities here:
Skin problems can be due to allergies as well as many other causes: bacterial infection, yeast infection, and demodex are other common skin problems. Once your vet is able to see you again I would recommend working through this with her; otherwise there are just so many possibilities that trying to navigate them yourself is pretty hard.

Dogs are allergic to a lot of things, just like people. Many dogs are very allergic to fleas - even just one bite - so make sure you are very vigilant with your flea protection. Many dogs are also allergic to something in their food - usually the protein source (chicken, beef, fish...). Even more dogs are allergic to something in the environment: dust, grass, pollen, cats... you name it. So just trying a different food doesn't necessarily address all the possibilities.

Generally what a vet will do is first rule out bacteria, yeast, and demodex. This can all happen during your vet visit. If the vet feels the problem is due to allergies, she will probably recommend a food trial where the dog eats a hypoallergenic food where the proteins and carbs have been cut up into tiny pieces so the dog's body cannot recognize any antigens that could cause allergies (food allergies develop over time when the dog is repeatedly exposed to a protein source or sometimes a carb source). During this food trial the dog eats a prescription food like Hills z/d or Purina HA and NOTHING else - treats contain intact protein and carb sources too and can trigger the allergies the same way the food can. A food trial usually lasts at least 8 weeks. If the dog improves, usually that means that the allergy was food-related. At that point the dog will probably get switched to a novel protein diet - meaning the protein source is something the dog has never eaten (and is thus probably not allergic to), or sometimes the dog is kept on the hypoallergenic food. If the dog does not improve during the food trial the allergies are assumed to be environmental and at that point you are looking at symptom management through medication, and - if you have the money - allergy testing. The better type of allergy testing involves having antigens injected into the dog to determine the precise cause of the allergies. Blood testing can be done too but is not very accurate. Once you know the source of the allergies you can either eliminate it from the environment if possible, or get allergy shots, or continue on the medical management of the symptoms.


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