Something is wrong with Obi.

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AllisonPitbullLvr
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Something is wrong with Obi.

Postby AllisonPitbullLvr » Thu Dec 02, 2010 7:08 am

So last night my fiance and I came home from a meeting with our realtors to put an offer in on a house to find Obi a little worked up in his crate. Let him out, he seemed fine. We went out for a late night potty break, he seemed fine.

I posted a few things on pbf while he was laying at my feet and then got up to go to bed. I flicked off the lights in our office and heard Obi whine. I turned the lights back on, thinking he was worked up still about being crated (he has on-going separation anxiety issues) only to see him standing like he was uncomfortable.

I gave him a thorough check-over to see where he was painful but can't find the specific spot. I know it's his back end but I'm not sure if it's his hips/knees/back.

All night I heard him whine every so often when he would try to move or change positions.

He ended up sleeping on the other dog bed, without Buddy, which is SO unusual. Once he got "comfortable" he didn't move all night.

I was hoping he had just slept funny while I was on pbf last night and that his leg was asleep but this morning he is shaking and whining and still uncomfortable. None of this is like him at all.

Going to go in to work early this morning and have a vet look at him.

Please send good thoughts!

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jamielvsaustin
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Re: Something is wrong with Obi.

Postby jamielvsaustin » Thu Dec 02, 2010 10:19 am

Positive thoughts/vibes sent!

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AllisonPitbullLvr
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Re: Something is wrong with Obi.

Postby AllisonPitbullLvr » Thu Dec 02, 2010 1:27 pm

Thanks jamielvsaustin. Turns out he has lumbosacral syndrome. See below:

Lumbosacral stenosis has also been termed lumbosacral instability, lumbosacral malformation, lumbosacral malarticulation, lumbar spinal stenosis, lumbosacral spondylolisthesis, lumbosacral nerve root compression, and cauda equina syndrome. All these terms describe arthritis of the joint between the last lumbar vertebra and the sacrum, which is one of the bones that makes up the pelvis. This arthritis narrows the canal through which the spinal cord and nerves pass through. The intervertebral disc between the vertebra and the sacrum is often abnormal as well, further narrowing the canal. The arthritis and disc disease put pressure on the nerves coming off the spinal cord. The symptoms of lumbosacral stenosis, then, are a result of nerve injury.

What are the symptoms of lumbosacral stenosis?

The most common sign of cauda equina syndrome is pain. The pain may occur in the back, in one or both hind legs, or the tail. The dog usually has difficulty rising from lying down, but once he begins to walk about he works out of the stiffness. There may be muscle loss in one or both rear legs. The dog may have difficulty urinating or defecating because of the pain, may become incontinent, or may be unable to urinate. Some dogs are unable to move their tail, or have severe pain if the tail is moved. Often dogs will have a shuffling gait, and scuff their toes. Some dogs will chew on their pelvic area, hind limbs, or tail, sometimes creating considerable damage by this self-mutilation.

Many of the signs seen with lumbosacral stenosis can mimic those of hip dysplasia, and the two conditions need to be differentiated.

Which animals are at risk of having lumbosacral stenosis?

Lumbosacral stenosis occurs most commonly in large breed dogs. German Shepherds appear to be more likely to develop this condition. The condition can be acquired, meaning the dog started out normal and then developed this condition. Or, lumbosacral stenosis can be a congenital condition, meaning the dog was born with the abnormality. Either way, the symptoms generally do not occur until the dog is between 3 and 7 years of age.

Lumbosacral stenosis is rarely seen in cats.

How is lumbosacral stenosis diagnosed?

The veterinarian will ask the owner for a history of when the symptoms developed, etc. A physical exam will then be performed. The hind limbs will be manipulated in various ways to determine which positions are painful. The veterinarian will also do a neurological exam, including testing the reflexes, to determine which nerves may be injured.

Radiographs (x-rays) are taken to evaluate the spine and pelvis. The findings can be very suggestive of lumbosacral stenosis, but are not sufficient to make the diagnosis. To achieve a diagnosis, special procedures must be performed by injecting dye into the affected area and re-radiographing. Depending on where the dye is placed, the procedure is called myelography, epidurography, or diskography. These procedures must be done under anesthesia. Displacement of the dye by the abnormalities in the bones and intervertebral disc confirms the diagnosis of lumbosacral stenosis.

How is lumbosacral stenosis treated?

Depending on the severity of the condition, amount of pain the animal is experiencing, overall health of the animal, financial restrictions, and other factors, lumbosacral stenosis is treated surgically or nonsurgically.

Nonsurgical treatment: If the condition is mild, dogs may be treated with strict rest for 6 to 8 weeks. Anti-inflammatory medications such as prednisolone are given. In many cases, this can relieve the symptoms. However, when the dog becomes more active, the symptoms can return.

Surgical treatment: There are two different surgical techniques used to treat lumbosacral stenosis. In the first, the bones are fused together in as normal a position as possible. This prevents abnormal motion between them, and reduces the risk of further arthritis. In the second technique, part of the bone and the intervertebral disc are removed to reduce pressure on the spinal cord and nerves.

In either case, dogs must be confined for 2 to 4 weeks after surgery, and may also be placed on prednisolone therapy. For dogs who have difficulty or are unable to urinate, the bladder must be manually expressed several times a day.

What is the prognosis for dogs with lumbosacral stenosis?

The outlook for dogs with lumbosacral stenosis is dependent on the severity of symptoms before treatment. Dogs who are mildly affected may be able to return to normal function. For those who are incontinent or unable to urinate prior to treatment, the prognosis is much poorer.


A weeks worth of STRICT rest (lord, help us.) and some metacam and hopefully he'll be back up to normal. I'm not sure what to do to prevent flare ups. Anyone dealt with this before?

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Misskiwi67
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Re: Something is wrong with Obi.

Postby Misskiwi67 » Thu Dec 02, 2010 2:08 pm

Did they take x-rays?

Rest and pain medications sounds right on the money... if his pain is not controlled in 2 days or so, you may want to ask about adding some muscle relaxers.

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dogs4jen
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Re: Something is wrong with Obi.

Postby dogs4jen » Thu Dec 02, 2010 2:54 pm

No advice, just :hug: to you and Obi. I hope the rest and meds work.

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spammie
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Re: Something is wrong with Obi.

Postby spammie » Thu Dec 02, 2010 4:33 pm

Heal quickly, Obi. :hug:

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stefaniej
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Re: Something is wrong with Obi.

Postby stefaniej » Thu Dec 02, 2010 4:57 pm

Get well soon!!! :pray

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AllisonPitbullLvr
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Re: Something is wrong with Obi.

Postby AllisonPitbullLvr » Thu Dec 02, 2010 7:26 pm

No x-rays Miss Kiwi. If he isn't better by Monday then we'll do xrays.

I was wondering about prednisone or gabapentin but hopefully since the boy has never needed any pain meds a day in his life, he will respond quickly and well to the Metacam and it will be enough.

He's still very twitchy around his spine when I touch him and is VERY subdued...so unlike him. Poor baby :(

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AllisonPitbullLvr
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Re: Something is wrong with Obi.

Postby AllisonPitbullLvr » Thu Dec 02, 2010 7:28 pm

Sorry for the double post but I have to say it's the strangest thing watching my 11 yr old pitbull play-bow and try to entice Obi to play and for him to just lay down and sigh. It's like I'm in the twilight zone.

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BrindleLvr
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Re: Something is wrong with Obi.

Postby BrindleLvr » Thu Dec 02, 2010 7:44 pm

poor Obi....what causes this issue to occur?

Hope he's feeling better soon!

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AllisonPitbullLvr
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Re: Something is wrong with Obi.

Postby AllisonPitbullLvr » Thu Dec 02, 2010 7:50 pm

BrindleLvr wrote:poor Obi....what causes this issue to occur?

Hope he's feeling better soon!


Trauma (not out of the question with how rough-and-tumble he is), infection (not likely) or congenital defect (most likely cause).

It's heartbreaking. All the times that I've wished he would chill for 5 minutes, I take back. It sucks seeing him so uncomfortable and confused.

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Leslie H
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Re: Something is wrong with Obi.

Postby Leslie H » Thu Dec 02, 2010 8:45 pm

That sounds so sad. I hope he feels better quickly.

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AllisonPitbullLvr
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Re: Something is wrong with Obi.

Postby AllisonPitbullLvr » Thu Dec 02, 2010 9:10 pm

He's very quiet still. I bought him a Kong genius toy, a monster mouth ball, some deer antlers and some other toys to keep him occupied this week.

I can't keep this dog stimulated on a GOOD day let alone when he's been cooped up for a week....

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Misskiwi67
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Re: Something is wrong with Obi.

Postby Misskiwi67 » Thu Dec 02, 2010 11:12 pm

Since Obi is on metacam, steroids are not an option... those two drugs don't mix well...

Hopefully he'll be better soon. Anyone who's ever had lower back pain can comisserate... its miserable, but taking it easy is the best thing you can do by far. Massage is also very helpful :D

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Re: Something is wrong with Obi.

Postby WackyJacki » Fri Dec 03, 2010 12:37 am

:pray


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