Cancer Treatment Experiences

Talk about diets, exercise, and disease.
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Timas Mom
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Re: Cancer Treatment Experiences

Postby Timas Mom » Wed Mar 16, 2011 11:56 pm

The only food studies I know of indicated that a low carb diet for cancer were looking at splenic cancers and other cancers, not specifically osteo. Some cancer cells thrive on carbs and simple sugars.

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trip8581
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Re: Cancer Treatment Experiences

Postby trip8581 » Thu Mar 17, 2011 12:50 am

So sorry to hear about Caesar.... that completely sucks. I do agree that if amputation is an option to definitely consider it as I have known people have had more time/good results with it in the past.

As far as chemo, my dog Rain had chemo for MCT this year and the treatment was very easy on her. She had 4 rounds of chemo with a drug called lomustine and you would have never known she was going through chemo as she still acted like the same dog (did not effect her energy level at all). I am not sure what kind of chemo options are available for osteosarcoma, but I would definitely not completely rule it out if it is a viable option. Chemo has come a long way for our pets and they actually do very well on it, so it is definitely a treatment to consider.

:hug:

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julie64
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Re: Cancer Treatment Experiences

Postby julie64 » Thu Mar 17, 2011 4:13 am

So sorry to hear this. This is a new board started for those of us dealing with cancer. I know one members dog had his leg amputated. It helps talking to people going through the same things.
http://k9cancer.org/index.php

You and Caesar are in my thoughts. :hug:

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PitFriend
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Re: Cancer Treatment Experiences

Postby PitFriend » Thu Mar 17, 2011 5:57 am

I'm so sorry to hear about Caesar. He has long been one of my favorite dogs here at PBF.

I dealt with osteosarcoma several years ago when my 16 year old husky was diagnosed in one of her front legs. It was decided that amputation was not an option for her due to her advanced age and other major health concerns, but if Caesar is an otherwise energetic and healthy dog I think amputation is probably your best bet. The thing with osteosarcoma, aside from it being a horrific disease, is that it is extremely painful, and without amputation good pain management can be very difficult.

My chocolate lab survived lymphoma with high quality of life for 2 years due to very successful chemo treatments, so I feel positively about chemotherapy, though I don't know much about it as an option for bone cancer.

I wish you and Caesar the best in whatever you decide to do, and hope for many more happy, healthy years together. :hug:

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Amie
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Re: Cancer Treatment Experiences

Postby Amie » Thu Mar 17, 2011 7:11 am

:hug:

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Leslie H
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Re: Cancer Treatment Experiences

Postby Leslie H » Thu Mar 17, 2011 8:29 am

Sending positive thoughts your way.

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akaspaddero
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Re: Cancer Treatment Experiences

Postby akaspaddero » Thu Mar 17, 2011 9:53 am

:hug:

Timas Mom wrote:. Some cancer cells thrive on carbs and simple sugars.

I too have heard cancer feeds on carbs and simple sugars.

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Fear_the_Sheeple
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Re: Cancer Treatment Experiences

Postby Fear_the_Sheeple » Thu Mar 17, 2011 10:10 am

Thanks for all the positive vibes and input, everyone! We are really keeping an optimistic view and looking into a lot of options for him. I know keeping positive and happy, and keeping him stress free will be hugely beneficial.

Thanks, community! :hug:

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Re: Cancer Treatment Experiences

Postby HappyPuppy » Thu Mar 17, 2011 10:13 am

You guys are in my thoughts! Dammit!!!!!!!!

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Misskiwi67
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Re: Cancer Treatment Experiences

Postby Misskiwi67 » Thu Mar 17, 2011 10:38 am

akaspaddero wrote::hug:

Timas Mom wrote:. Some cancer cells thrive on carbs and simple sugars.

I too have heard cancer feeds on carbs and simple sugars.


This is a case where a home-made diet is ideal. There's no such thing as carb-free kibble.

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dogs4jen
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Re: Cancer Treatment Experiences

Postby dogs4jen » Thu Mar 17, 2011 10:45 am

I'm so sorry, :hug:

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Misskiwi67
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Re: Cancer Treatment Experiences

Postby Misskiwi67 » Thu Mar 17, 2011 11:09 am

Since I'm sure you're being absolutely bombarded with diet plans and options, here's some resources you should be able to trust:

http://www.cvsangelcare.com/html/ac_nutrition.htm

If you read the references at the bottom of this, you will see Dr. Ogilvie's name a LOT... he is the owner of the angel care practice.

Introduction

With the exception of canine lymphoma, there is no accepted dietary recommendation for cancer patients. Veterinarians and pet owners interested in alternatives or complements to conventional practice often shun commercial diets, and some cancer patients refuse them, as well. Below are some recipes and suggestions for nutritional support of cancer patients.

References

Related Info

Feedback: VINFAQ@vin.com

Clinical Use Information
Are there any good home-made diets for cancer patients?
Can I use spices to improve palatability?
Are there nutritional supplements that have antineoplastic or immunomodulatory properties?
What else can I do to support my patient?
Do we know if they work?

Are there any good home-made diets for cancer patients?
I have used a variety of home-prepared and commercial diets for my cancer patients. Based on Ogilvie's work using low carbohydrate, moderate fat and moderate protein diets for lymphoma patients, we have used homemade diets that reduce carbohydrates while providing quality protein, presumably appropriate fat and fatty acid profiles, and high levels of nutrient rich vegetables.1

Rule number one is to KEEP THEM EATING, so we don't stand on principle if our patients dislike our cooking. On the other hand, the majority of canine and feline patients appear to improve in general condition after becoming acclimated to the diet below, and we assume that their general improvement bodes well for the course of their disease, at least to optimize survival times.

Guidelines for cooking for canine cancer patients:
50% fish or poultry (organic preferred but not necessary)
50% mixed frozen or fresh vegetables
Flax or olive oil as a source of fat calories - about 1 teaspoon per 20 pounds of body weight
A HUMAN daily vitamin-mineral supplement (one dose for animals over 20 pounds, ½ dose for animals under 20 lbs)
A calcium carbonate source - about 250 mg per 15 pounds of body weight
(This recipe can be used for cats with the meat at 80% and vegetables 20%, and added taurine, 250-400mg daily)

Many people use a crock-pot to stew all ingredients together. Some prefer to steam the vegetables, add the cooked meat, and throw everything into a food mill so that it looks like commercial canned food. Raw meat is never recommended for animals undergoing chemotherapy or who are immune suppressed in any way. This recipe is NOT balanced - the patient and the recipe should be re-evaluated frequently in order to adjust the recipe according to the animal's weight, disease progression, and other changes in condition.

Can I use spices to improve palatability?
There are a number of spices shown to have anti-neoplastic activity that will also improve the flavor of this recipe. Garlic may induce differentiation and apoptosis in some tumor cell lines.2,3 Try FRESH minced garlic - about 1 clove per 40 pounds of body weight, and turmeric, about 1 teaspoon per 50 pounds of body weight. Garlic may oxidize red blood cells and at high doses can lead to clinically significant anemia, but the benefits, and the fact that the taste can sometimes stimulate appetite, make use of the herb worthwhile. The CBC can be monitored regularly to curtail potential problems before they become serious.

Turmeric, the yellow (and rather mild) spice that gives curry its yellow color, is a strong antioxidant. The flavonoid extract, curcumin, is anti-angiogenic, induces apoptosis, and modulates expression of various proteins including COX-2, 5-LOX, TNF, NF-kappa B, and others. Curcumin itself is not well absorbed systemically, but is currently in favor for treatment of GI cancers.4-7 Turmeric is rather milder tasting than one would expect. Most dogs, and even some cats, accept it readily. The dose of turmeric is high, up to one tablespoon daily for large dogs. The dose of curcumin is proportional by weight to that recommended on the label, for people.

Are there nutritional supplements that have antineoplastic or immunomodulatory properties?
Nutritional supplements are supportive and mild, but many do have anti-cancer effects in in-vitro and even in vivo studies. Because of their mechanisms of action, it has been suggested that they are best used in combinations of at least 10 to 15 elements.

Antioxidants are often recommended for cancer patients; they may slow proliferation of neoplastic cells and reduce adverse effects of chemotherapy. While many believe that antioxidants interfere with chemotherapy, others suggest that they actually enhance the effects of chemotherapy.8 Alkylating agents destroy DNA by oxidative means, but this may not be their only mechanism of action, as recent evidence suggests that they also trigger apoptosis. Some trials suggest that antioxidants are effective in mitigating the side effects of chemotherapy and radiation, and improve quality of life. Human clinical trials addressing this subject have been published, but the evidence is still conflicting.9 A critical review of 50 randomized controlled trials or observational studies reporting concomitant use of nutritional supplement and chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy was recently published. In 15 of those studies, 3738 patients took antioxidants and other nutrients, and were reported to have increased survival.10

I use antioxidants in cancer patients who are old (where there is clear benefit for joint pain, mobility and cognitive dysfunction in these patients) and where patients are experiencing side effects from conventional treatment. Antioxidants such as Vitamin C, E, selenium and the antioxidant enzymes are mutually dependant on each other for their generation and activity. For this reason, antioxidants should be provided as a broad spectrum, rather than singly. The beneficial effects of fish oil may also be suppressed by high levels of added antioxidants, so I usually recommend low to moderate doses of a combination product.

Fish oil (salmon or menhaden body oil) appears to have antiproliferative activity in some tumor cell lines, antimetastatic activity in laboratory animals, and anti-cachectic activity in human patients.11,12 The benefits for patients with cancer are linked with the ability to attenuate systemic inflammation.13 It is frequently recommended for canine and feline cancer patients at a rate of 1 extra strength capsule (500-600 mg of DHA and EPA) per 10-20 lbs of body weight.

Plant-derived flavonoids have been studied in the prevention of cancer. These include resveratrol from red grapes (and wine), green tea polyphenols, and phytoestrogens from soy and other plants. Other less well known flavonoids commonly found in medicinal herbs include curcumin (from turmeric), apigenin, anthocyanidins (from berries), quercetin, and many others (approximately 4000 flavonoids have been described). In addition to well-recognized antioxidant effects that may help in prevention of cancer, certain flavonoids have been found to have activity in inducing differentiation and apoptosis, inhibiting protein kinases, facilitating cell-cell communication, inhibiting angiogenesis, cancer cell invasion mechanisms and metastasis mechanisms, as well as enhancing immune function.14,15

The green tea polyphenol, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), has been shown to have anti-angiogenic and antiproliferative properties in addition to preventing cancers. One recent in vitro study even suggested that EGCG reversed p-glycoprotein mediated multiple drug resistance.16 In human clinical trials, 200mg daily of EGCG led to benefits, while up to 800mg daily was tolerated. I would suggest scaling the dose down by weight, and using the extract instead of dried green tea leaves, as the dose of the dried herb may affect patient appetite if provided in food.

What else can I do to support my patient?
Cancer patients are most often older, with the age-related diseases that accompany that process. Practitioners and caregivers must consider pain from arthritis, rheumatism (muscle spasms, trigger points) and the tumor itself. In addition, geriatric patients may experience cognitive decline or the cumulative effects of chronic disease and chronic medication administration (in some cases leading to bowel hyperpermeability). For these patients, various supportive measures, such as massage and acupuncture may literally be lifesaving. For those who have chronic allergies, or have been administered NSAIDs, steroids, antibiotics and other drugs that affect bowel bacterial balance or mucosal integrity, prebiotics and probiotics may be appropriate.

Do we know if they work?
None of the nutritional therapies discussed have proven effects, used alone, in specific cancers of canine or feline patients. However, this author uses them in most clinical cases presented and in combinations, based on past perceived clinical success - they caused no harm and appeared to benefit the patient. If cancer patients feel good enough to tolerate the diet change and supplements, this regimen of low carbohydrate homemade diet with therapeutic spices, antioxidants and fish oil can improve and maintain good physical condition in a number of patients.

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REFERENCES
Journal Articles
1. Ogilvie GK. Interventional nutrition for the cancer patient. Clin Tech Small Anim Pract 1998;13(4):224-31
2. Li X; Xie J; Li W. Garlic oil induces differentiation and apoptosis of human gastric cancer cell line. Chung Hua Chung Liu Tsa Chih 1998;20(5):325-7
3. Thatte U; Bagadey S; Dahanukar S. Modulation of programmed cell death by medicinal plants. Cell Mol Biol 2000;46(1):199-214
4. Furness MS, Robinson TP, Ehlers T, Hubbard RB 4th, Arbiser JL, Goldsmith DJ, Bowen JP. Antiangiogenic agents: studies on fumagillin and curcumin analogs. Curr Pharm Des. 2005;11(3):357-73
5. Sharma RA, Gescher AJ, Steward WP. Curcumin: the story so far. Eur J Cancer. 2005 Sep;41(13):1955-68
6. Karunagaran D, Rashmi R, Kumar TR. Induction of apoptosis by curcumin and its implications for cancer therapy. Curr Cancer Drug Targets. 2005 Mar;5(2):117-29
7. Aggarwal BB, Kumar A, Bharti AC. Anticancer potential of curcumin: preclinical and clinical studies. Anticancer Res. 2003 Jan-Feb;23(1A):363-98
8. Conklin KA. Dietary antioxidants during cancer chemotherapy: impact on chemotherapeutic effectiveness and development of side effects. Nutr Cancer 2000;37(1):1-18
9. Block KI. Antioxidants and cancer therapy: furthering the debate. Integr Cancer Ther. 2004 Dec;3(4):342-8
10. Simone CB, Simone NL, Simone V, Simone CB. Antioxidants and other nutrients do not interfere with chemotherapy and radiation therapy and can increase kill and increase survival, part 2. Alternative Therapies 13(2):40-46.
11. Rose DP; Connolly JM. Omega-3 fatty acids as cancer chemopreventive agents. Pharmacol Ther 1999;83(3):217-44
12. Sauer LA; Dauchy RT; Blask DE. Mechanism for the antitumor and anticachectic effects of n-3 fatty acids. Cancer Res 2000;60(18):5289-95
13. Deans C, Wigmore SJ. Systemic inflammation, cachexia and prognosis in patients with cancer. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2005 May;8(3):265-9
14. Lopez-Lazaro M. Flavonoids as anticancer agents: structure-activity relationship study. Curr Med Chem Anti-Canc Agents. 2002;2(6):691-714.
15. Boik, John. Natural Compounds in Cancer Therapy. Princeton, Minn, 2001, Oregon Medical Press
16. Qian F, Wei D, Zhang Q, Yang S. Modulation of P-glycoprotein function and reversal of multidrug resistance by (-)-epigallocatechin gallate in human cancer cells. Biomed Pharmacother. 2005 Apr;59(3):64-9
Proceedings
1. Roudebush P. The Use of Nutraceuticals in Cancer Therapy. Proceedings ACVIM 2005
2. Ogilvie GK. Nutrition and Cancer: New Keys for Cure and Control 2003! Proceedings WSAVA 2003
3. Ogilvie GK. Care Beyond a Cure: Nutrition and Cancer--Exciting Advances for 2003. Proceedings Atlantic Coast Veterinary Conference 2003
4. Davenport DJ. The Use of Dietary Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in the Management of Cancer Patients. Proceedings ACVIM 2003
5. Bartges JW. Nutrition and Feline Cancer. Proceedings 12th ECVIM-CA/ESVIM Congress 2002
6. Lana SE. Nutrition and the Cancer Patient. Proceedings WVC 2002
7. Maudlin G. Nutrition and the Small Animal Cancer Patient. Proceedings WSAVA 2001

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Fear_the_Sheeple
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Re: Cancer Treatment Experiences

Postby Fear_the_Sheeple » Thu Mar 17, 2011 11:37 am

Thanks so much misskiwi - that is really helpful!

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ClickNtreat
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Re: Cancer Treatment Experiences

Postby ClickNtreat » Thu Mar 17, 2011 6:31 pm

Positive thoughts and healing vibes for Caesar and for you. Hang in there miracles do happen & follow your heart, you know him the very best.

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Fear_the_Sheeple
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Re: Cancer Treatment Experiences

Postby Fear_the_Sheeple » Thu Mar 17, 2011 7:27 pm

Thank you so much. :hug:


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