RAW FOODS?

Talk about diets, exercise, and disease.
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IamaDick
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Postby IamaDick » Tue May 16, 2006 10:18 am

So whats the difference between cooking the food and just giving it raw? I could see giving beef raw but wont the chicken hurt him if its raw? Or do i just give everything to him raw?

48lawsofpower

Postby 48lawsofpower » Tue May 16, 2006 10:27 am

IamaDick wrote:So whats the difference between cooking the food and just giving it raw? I could see giving beef raw but wont the chicken hurt him if its raw? Or do i just give everything to him raw?



actually you have it backwards, you dont want to give the dog cooked chicken because teh bones will splinter.


I suggest you read these websites if you have questions about RAW feedind, they helped me tremendously


http://www.rawlearning.com/rawfaq.html


http://www.rawdogranch.com/rawdietbasics.htm

48lawsofpower

Postby 48lawsofpower » Tue May 16, 2006 10:31 am

Sorry about the typos, I was skeptical at first as well, but after much research and after trying it out...I am convinced raw feeding is the only way to go.


I tried to give my girl some kibble yesterday and she looked at me like I was out of my damn mind.

haha

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NatX
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Postby NatX » Wed May 17, 2006 8:46 am

Dogs are carnivores so feeding meat is a natural choice. Canines have a high stomache pH which is enough to dissolve bone as well as killing alot of bacteria. Thier digestive track is capable of handling alot of things and built for meat processing.

Cooking will also denature most proteins and make them less biologically available, basically decreases the benefit of feeding raw. Eggs on the other hand increase in bio-availability, but raw eggs won't hurt either.

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IamaDick
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Postby IamaDick » Wed May 17, 2006 12:58 pm

Thanks for the info, the cooked chicken by the way is boneless. I get it through my work, i guess i need to stop thinking of my dog as a human and just give it raw. lol

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mom2bennientiny
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Postby mom2bennientiny » Wed May 17, 2006 5:10 pm

Maybe someone already mentioned this and I just didn't notice, but canned tuna is not good.....way too much mercury. Ditch that! If you want to try canned, go for canned mackeral and give bones and all. Many rawfeeders use this as part of the overall diet. For some reason, it counts even though it's actually cooked.

Kirstan
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Postby Kirstan » Wed May 17, 2006 6:36 pm

Honestly, see if there is a holistic vet or a vet with a nutrition emphasis around you specializing in nutrition who can sketch out a raw food or homemade food plan for you. You'll make sure you're getting everything you need in there and will have someone to talk with if something doesn't go right.

IMO, it's not cheaper to do raw feeding and it's definitely time consuming on some levels. I never would have started it if I would have just been reading the 'boards' online. I went to my vet, she drew it out for each dog based on their age, if they had allergies, the level of exercise they get, etc. It works nicely for us but it's not cheaper. They look great on it.

~k.

48lawsofpower

Postby 48lawsofpower » Fri May 19, 2006 9:05 am

Actually it is quite a bit cheaper than kibble. I buy in Bulk and get 50 lbs of chicken/necks and backs at .16 a lb. For quality kibble I was paying almost a dollar a lb.

The only people who are going to tell you its not cheaper are probally those who buy at grocery store. Buy in bulk and you can find great prices.

Also maybe check out a co-op in your are and you can get RAW food even cheaper.

We feed chicken necks and backs, chicken leg quarters, beef heart and liver, turkey necks, tripe and emu.

If you do the leg work it can be a lot easier on the pocketbook than kibble. especially if you are feeding multiple dogs.

pittiepride

Postby pittiepride » Fri May 19, 2006 10:22 am

That sounds like a lot of chicken...and I personally feel chicken has too much bone and not enough meat for a long term diet. But that is just me. I like to feed a basis of red meat and chicken backs and necks ground as my bone content (about 15% of the total day/weeks meals). I don't know the exact number but I beleive that the chicken mixture is much higher in bone than in protien. I simply mix the ground chicken, in with my beef mixture. I usually do about 2:1 beef.

Tripe is excellent because it is the most complete. There is protien, calcium and phosphorous in the 1:1 ratio (perfect), plant matter and probiotics.

kara

48lawsofpower

Postby 48lawsofpower » Fri May 19, 2006 10:26 am

pittiepride wrote:That sounds like a lot of chicken...and I personally feel chicken has too much bone and not enough meat for a long term diet. But that is just me. I like to feed a basis of red meat and chicken backs and necks ground as my bone content (about 15% of the total day/weeks meals). I don't know the exact number but I beleive that the chicken mixture is much higher in bone than in protien. I simply mix the ground chicken, in with my beef mixture. I usually do about 2:1 beef.

Tripe is excellent because it is the most complete. There is protien, calcium and phosphorous in the 1:1 ratio (perfect), plant matter and probiotics.

kara




I didnt specify ho wmuch chicken I feed, just how much I buy..how can you conclude that it is too much chicken.

my dogs eat a ratio similar to this:


60% Raw Meaty Bones (meat with bone – chicken necks, backs, etc.)

35% Muscle Meat (meat without bones)

5% Organ Meat (liver, kidney, lungs, etc.)



and i do NOT feed ground meat. Defeats the purpose if you ask me. Plus the bone is good for mental activity, and muscle exercise also dental benefits .

In a small number of cases, invariably where the dog/cat has a rare medical condition, ground bones are necessary.

However, in over 99% of cases, dogs should be fed whole meaty bones/carcasses. Ground bones are a poor substitute to whole bones. In addition, consuming such does not give the dogs the important muscle work out they need.

There has also been a very small number of cases caused by impaction of ground bones.

Frankly, feeding ground bones tends to help nervous owners get over the whole "can't possibly feed my dogs whole bones" mentality, but is not the best thing for your dog. If you insist on feeding ground bones, please understand the negatives of such.

48lawsofpower

Postby 48lawsofpower » Fri May 19, 2006 10:32 am

sorry for the double post but we feed trip once a week as well, just wanted to add that.

pittiepride

Postby pittiepride » Fri May 19, 2006 10:41 am

I wasn't trying to be rude 48lawsofpower. I think it is great for everyone to voice thier own ideas and opinions. People can read and make their own educated judgements for what works for them.

I don't really need to justify why I feed raw the way I do but I will clarify a bit for the new people here. I originally fed whole bones, carcasses of chicken and such but my dog cannot handle them. He chews of large chunks and then pukes them up for two or three days. The leg and wing bones that came up were very sharp. Even if I held the pieces and he chewed small chunks he puked.My dog just has a sensitivity to bones I guess. He is given knuckle bones, marrow bones, neck bones from cows, chicken necks, backs, wings, breasts, turkey and all had the same result: days of puking. So now I feed the chicken/bone ground and no more puking. He still gets a large bone to knaw on once a week for his exercise and teeth cleaning though.

Impaction can happen from ground bones yes if it is fed strictly as their diet and from what I understand it is mostly from bone meal or powder. It can also occur from eating whole bones improperly. The ground that I recieve is rough not like ground beef at all. The bones are visible but in smaller pieces.

I am confident in my choices as a raw feeder and my dogs are happy and healthy.

kara

48lawsofpower

Postby 48lawsofpower » Fri May 19, 2006 10:49 am

pittiepride wrote:I wasn't trying to be rude 48lawsofpower. I think it is great for everyone to voice thier own ideas and opinions. People can read and make their own educated judgements for what works for them.

I don't really need to justify why I feed raw the way I do but I will clarify a bit for the new people here. I originally fed whole bones, carcasses of chicken and such but my dog cannot handle them. He chews of large chunks and then pukes them up for two or three days. The leg and wing bones that came up were very sharp. Even if I held the pieces and he chewed small chunks he puked.My dog just has a sensitivity to bones I guess. He is given knuckle bones, marrow bones, neck bones from cows, chicken necks, backs, wings, breasts, turkey and all had the same result: days of puking. So now I feed the chicken/bone ground and no more puking. He still gets a large bone to knaw on once a week for his exercise and teeth cleaning though.

Impaction can happen from ground bones yes if it is fed strictly as their diet and from what I understand it is mostly from bone meal or powder. It can also occur from eating whole bones improperly. The ground that I recieve is rough not like ground beef at all. The bones are visible but in smaller pieces.

I am confident in my choices as a raw feeder and my dogs are happy and healthy.

kara




well Im glad for you.


different strokes for different folks


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