IAMS?

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krystallovespitbulls

IAMS?

Postby krystallovespitbulls » Fri Oct 13, 2006 7:49 pm

is IAMS a good dog food?

I have come across these resorses(sp?)

can you tell me what you think?

http://www.uncaged.co.uk/iamsresponse.htm

I don't like PETA but I found this one too:

http://www.iamscruelty.com/

and this one:
http://www.americanchronicle.com/articl ... cleID=4136

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Postby peder » Fri Oct 13, 2006 7:56 pm

iams is the best, or so i thought, we fed it to Bubba for about 2 months, and he started getting big lumpy spots, and scratching all over.
all that disappeared when we changed food.
my advice is to stay away from it

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Postby chewbecca » Fri Oct 13, 2006 8:10 pm

my opinion?
No. Iams is NOT a good food.
I would NOT feed it to my dog.

But there's a LOT of food I would NOT feed my dog.

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Postby Lmporter03 » Fri Oct 13, 2006 8:22 pm

Iams , science diet, eukanuba and all very low quality, high priced foods. ingredients are no better than standard dog chow but 3 times the price.

check this

http://www.dogfoodanalysis.com/dog_food ... /index.php

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Postby blkngldbabe » Fri Oct 13, 2006 8:22 pm

More people stay away from it due to the cruelty issues, but nutritionally you could always switch to sawdust... :tongue:

In one of the other threads in this section I posted a link on how to grade your dog food and how many popular brands rated. I'll try to find it and repost it here.

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Postby blkngldbabe » Fri Oct 13, 2006 8:32 pm

Taken from a food thread on another pitbull forum that was allowed to be crossposted and posted by Cuda

Thanks to Kogeki and HausMommy for allowing me to crosspost.

Prepared by HausMommy

Here is a list of ingredients and definitions you'll find in your dog's food: http://www.redbandannapetfood.com/ingredient.htm


How to grade your dog's food:
Start with a grade of 100:

1) For every listing of "by-product", subtract 10 points

2) For every non-specific animal source ("meat" or "poultry", meat, meal or fat) reference, subtract 10 points

3) If the food contains BHA, BHT, or ethoxyquin, subtract 10 points

4) For every grain "mill run" or non-specific grain source, subtract 5 points

5) If the same grain ingredient is used 2 or more times in the first five ingredients (i.e. "ground brown rice", "brewer’s rice", "rice flour" are all the same grain), subtract 5 points

6) If the protein sources are not meat meal and there are less than 2 meats in the top 3 ingredients, subtract 3 points

7) If it contains any artificial colorants, subtract 3 points

8 ) If it contains ground corn or whole grain corn, subtract 3 points

9) If corn is listed in the top 5 ingredients, subtract 2 more points

10) If the food contains any animal fat other than fish oil, subtract 2 points

11) If lamb is the only animal protein source (unless your dog is allergic to other protein sources), subtract 2 points

12) If it contains soy or soybeans, subtract 2 points

13) If it contains wheat (unless you know that your dog isn’t allergic to wheat), subtract 2 points

14) If it contains beef (unless you know that your dog isn’t allergic to beef), subtract 1 point

15) If it contains salt, subtract 1 point

Extra Credit:

1) If any of the meat sources are organic, add 5 points

2) If the food is endorsed by any major breed group or nutritionist, add 5 points

3) If the food is baked not extruded, add 5 points

4) If the food contains probiotics, add 3 points

5) If the food contains fruit, add 3 points

6) If the food contains vegetables (NOT corn or other grains), add 3 points

7) If the animal sources are hormone-free and antibiotic-free, add 2 points

8 ) If the food contains barley, add 2 points

9) If the food contains flax seed oil (not just the seeds), add 2 points

10) If the food contains oats or oatmeal, add 1 point

11) If the food contains sunflower oil, add 1 point

12) For every different specific animal protein source (other than the first one; count "chicken" and "chicken meal" as only one protein source, but "chicken" and "" as 2 different sources), add 1 point

13) If it contains glucosamine and chondroitin, add 1 point

14) If the vegetables have been tested for pesticides and are pesticide-free, add 1 point

94-100+ = A
86-93 = B
78-85 = C
70-77 = D
<70 = F

Here are some foods that have already been scored.
Dog Food scores:

Authority Harvest Baked / Score 116 A+

Bil-Jac Select / Score 68 F

Canidae / Score 112 A+

Chicken Soup Senior / Score 115 A+

Diamond Maintenance / Score 64 F

Diamond Lamb Meal & Rice / Score 92 B

Diamond Large Breed 60+ Formula / Score 99 A

Dick Van Patten's Natural Balance Ultra Premium / Score 122 A+

Dick Van Patten's Duck and Potato / Score 106 A+

Foundations / Score 106 A+

Hund-n-Flocken Adult Dog (lamb) by Solid Gold / Score 93 D

Iams Lamb Meal & Rice Formula Premium / Score 73 D

Innova Dog / Score 114 A+

Innova Evo / Score 114 A+

Kirkland Signature Chicken, Rice, and Vegetables / Score 110 A+

Nutrisource Lamb and Rice / Score 87 B

Nutro Natural Choice Large Breed Puppy / Score 87 B

Pet Gold Adult with Lamb & Rice / Score 23 F

Purina Benful / Score 17 F

Purina Dog / Score 62 F

Purina Come-n-Get It / Score 16 F

Royal Canin Bulldog / Score 100 A+

Royal Canin Natural Blend Adult / Score 106 A+

Sensible Choice Chicken and Rice / Score 97 A

Science Diet Advanced Protein Senior 7+ / Score 63 F

Science Diet for Large Breed Puppies / Score 69 F

Wellness Super5 Mix Chicken / Score 110 A+

Wolfking Adult Dog (bison) by Solid Gold / Score 97 A

(Editing to add more products as found on thread.)

Innova = A, score 101

Foundations = A Score 106

Innova Evo - 114

Innova Dog - 114

Wellness Super 5 - 110

Science Diet Large Breed Puppy / 69 F

Diamond Lamb and Rice / 92 A

Chicken Soup Senior / 115 A+

DVP Duck and Potato / 106 A+

Royal Canin Bulldog / 100 A

Kirkland Signature - Chicken, Rice & Vegetables / 110 A+

NUTRO natural choice large breed puppy / 87 B+

NutriSource® Lamb Meal & Rice / 87 B+

Sensible Choice / 97 A

Purina One Large Breed Puppy / 62 F

Nutru Max Adult / 93 A

Eagle Pack Holisitc / 102 A

Summit / 99 A



Worst part is...look at the scores from some of the foods "pimped" by vets?!?! Yuck!

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Postby Lmporter03 » Fri Oct 13, 2006 8:43 pm

I just switched to Blue buffalo brand, it ranks around 107 by this scale. I plan to supplement raw in the near future

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Postby Misskiwi67 » Fri Oct 13, 2006 11:09 pm

Why is Barley and Oats better than rice? And why do breed groups and nutritionists get to give bonus points, but veterinarians can't??? Why do points get subtracted when beef and wheat are added?? Due to allergies? Ridiculous. Allergens are allergens are allergens. Each dog is different...

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Postby Linariel » Fri Oct 13, 2006 11:40 pm

I don't think it's ridiculous, I think it's based on the most COMMON allergens.

It's kind of a 'play it safe' scale to avoid the most common ingredients that cause problems.

Kind of like MOST vets don't recommend quality food.

You've said yourself they don't get as much nutrition education as they should, so I'm assuming nutritionists *generally* recommend higher quality food.

It's a scale based on probability and likelihood....just as any rating system is.

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Postby Misskiwi67 » Sat Oct 14, 2006 12:02 am

Linariel wrote:I don't think it's ridiculous, I think it's based on the most COMMON allergens.



The most common allergens are also the most COMMON ingredients. If you want to play the numbers game, correlate the number of allergic dogs with the number of exposures... THERE is your answer to why dogs are allergic to corn, beef, wheat, milk and eggs.

Yes, some things are more likely to cause allergies, but if half the united states didn't eat peanuts, the number of people allergic to peanuts would drop by 50%.

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Postby Linariel » Sat Oct 14, 2006 12:03 am

I'm not arguing that. I understand it.

I'm just saying that's why the scale is the way it is....they favor less common ingredients, and therefore less common allergens.

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Postby Misskiwi67 » Sat Oct 14, 2006 12:09 am

Linariel wrote:I'm not arguing that. I understand it.

I'm just saying that's why the scale is the way it is....they favor less common ingredients, and therefore less common allergens.


All the more allergens to become allergic to... I still don't see why that should make the difference between a passing and failing grade.

As a future vet, I'd personally rather see a dog that wasn't exposed to every allergen under the sun, that hadn't been rotated through 8 different protein sources so that I could find a new protein source for a food trial for those 10 PERCENT of dogs with food allergies and actually have an opportunity to help them without having to find such oddities as Emu and kangaroo, or god forbid hydrolyzed proteins.

A lot of the things on that list are very valid... I just had to point out a few silly fallacies that people still like to get caught up on...

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Postby barbponys » Sat Oct 14, 2006 6:31 pm

I find it hard to believe that all allergic dogs are allergic to the most common allegens just from exposure. Many of the things Goliath is allergic too aren't found in common foods. The person I got him from fed one food to all her dogs, no beef, corn or soy were in that food. Eggs, and catfish weren't in it either! It WAS lamb based. He had advanced allergies at 18 months. While on the extract he ate raw chicken, lamb and beef, no problem. The same with eggs. Feed him something with cooked lamb or chicken and he was trying to remove his skin with in hours. Long before his allegies changed drastically he could eat anything I gave him, except buffalo. I thought he was going to have a mental breakdown after feeding him some raw buffalo, it was so sad. To me it's as much WHAT we are feeding as what we BREEDING. More dogs have more allergies at younger ages and as the years have gone by it's become alarming. Breeding poorly bred dogs to poorly bred dogs. No conisideration to WHAT that does to the dog or to future puppies that people will INSIST on breeding to MORE poorly bred dogs. Too many chemicals introduced to young bodies way too young. Weaning at 4 weeks and feeding crap. "Good" foods change over time, and bad foods never get better.

Considering dogs don't need grain, the more pointed question would be, WHY feed it to them at all? It makes sense to me that they would have far more problems with grain than meat. I've run into one other dog that was allergic to just about every meat out there. It was a shepherd, her family switched her to raw and she did MUCH better. Even on the meats she was "allergic" too.

To me, the rating of a product dogs shouldn't even be eating is amusing. Add in the assumptions on allergies and it's................:dunno:

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Postby Misskiwi67 » Sat Oct 14, 2006 6:37 pm

Allergies don't work that way... you can't be allergic on the first exposure. The immune system has to react and produce antibodies for mast cells to degranulate and THEN you get the histamine release, the itchiness and so forth... makes me wonder what your dog was really allergic to. So many dogs have so many ingredients, and very few people do a true elimination trial early on...

I agree on just about everything else. Poor breeding is becoming common, allergies have always been common, but seldom treated. Dogs are definately exposed to a lot of crap... but switching foods every month sure doesn't help.

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Postby barbponys » Sat Oct 14, 2006 7:00 pm

So explain why his blood reacted to allergens he had never been fed? We had him 6-9 months before we had him tested. He didn't eat ANY dry food in that time. The only grain in the food he HAD been eating for 6 months prior to that was lamb and rice(Cal Nat). He never had soy, corn, wheat, catfish............ So his histamine response shouldn't have been programed.

We also don't have and never have had cockroaches in our house, yet he's highly allergic. I've never even SEEN one in this area, let alone had one.


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