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What do i do when my dog is choking?

Posted: Mon Jul 23, 2007 5:10 am
by ThompsonZ
Hi yesterday my dog got hold of a raw chicken theigh that my was going to be cooked but dropped on the floor and the dog got it. Usually he would chew but this time he quickly gulped it down. then he started to choke and cry and i did not have a clue in what to do but tap his back. now he coughs now and then but seems ok now.

God forbid but if this happens again where my dog is choking what should i do?

Posted: Mon Jul 23, 2007 8:54 am
by bll516
I think someone should make a sticky about this!

Posted: Mon Jul 23, 2007 11:20 am
by clownracer
found on google

How to Treat a Choking Dog

When a dog is choking on a foreign object, it needs help at once. The harder it tries to breathe, the more panicky it becomes. Your goal in this emergency situation is to open the dog's airway without being bitten.

The signs that a dog is choking include pawing at the mouth, a pale or blue tongue, obvious distress, or unconsciousness. If the dog is unconscious and you believe a foreign object is present, you must open the airway before giving the dog cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). If the dog cannot breathe, efforts to revive it will be fruitless.

While all this sounds quite overwhelming, you can help a choking or unconscious dog by following the basic tips outlined below. Your efforts may save a dog's life!

Step 1: Restrain the dog if necessary.

Step 1a: Approach the dog slowly, speaking in a reassuring tone of voice.

Step 2: Clear the airway.

Step 2d
©2006 Publications International, Ltd.
Step 2d

Step 2a: Open the dog's mouth carefully by grasping the upper jaw with one hand over the muzzle.

Step 2b: Press the dog's lips over the upper teeth by pressing your thumb on one side and your fingers on the other so that the lips are between the dog's teeth and your fingers. Apply firm pressure to force the mouth open.

Step 2c: If you can see the object, try to remove it with your fingers.

Step 2d: If you cannot remove the object and the dog is small enough, pick it up by grasping its back legs; turn it upside down and shake vigorously. Slapping its back while shaking may help to dislodge the object.

Step 2e: If you cannot remove the object and the dog is too large to pick up, place the dog on its side on the floor. Place your hand just behind the rib cage and press down and slightly forward quickly and firmly. Release. Repeat rapidly several times until the object is expelled.

Step 3: If you cannot dislodge the object, transport the dog immediately to the veterinarian.

Step 4: If you dislodge the object and the dog is not breathing, feel for a heartbeat by placing your fingers about 2 inches behind the dog's elbow in the middle of its chest.

Step 5: If the dog's heart is not beating, proceed to Step 6. If it is, perform artificial respiration.

Step 5b
©2006 Publications International, Ltd.
Step 5b

Step 5a: Turn the dog on its side.

Step 5b: Extend the dog's head and neck. Hold the dog's mouth and lips closed and blow firmly into its nostrils. Administer 1 breath every 3 to 5 seconds. Take a deep breath, and repeat until you feel resistance or see the chest rise.

Step 5c: After 10 seconds, stop. Watch the chest for movement to indicate the dog is breathing on its own.

Step 5d: If the dog is not breathing, continue artificial respiration.

Step 6: If the heart is not beating, perform CPR.

CPR for Dogs Weighing up to 45 Pounds

Step 6a: Turn the dog on its back.

Step 6c
©2006 Publications International, Ltd.
Step 6c

Step 6b: Kneel down at the head of the dog.

Step 6c: Clasp your hands over the dog's chest with your palms resting on either side of its chest.

Step 6d: Compress your palms on the chest firmly for a count of "2," and release for a count of "1." Moderate pressure is required. Repeat about 60 to 90 times per minute.

Step 6e: Alternately (after 30 seconds), hold the dog's mouth and lips closed and blow firmly into its nostrils. Blow for 3 seconds, take a deep breath, and repeat until you feel resistance or see the dog's chest rise. Try to repeat this 10 to 20 times per minute. As a general rule, use a CPR ratio of about 5 heart compressions to 1 breath of air.

Step 6f: After 1 minute, stop. Look at the chest for breathing movement, and feel for a heartbeat by placing fingers about 2 inches behind the dog's elbow in the center of its chest.

Step 6g: If the dog's heart is not beating, continue CPR. If the heart starts beating, but the dog is still not breathing, return to Step 5.

CPR for Dogs Weighing More Than 45 Pounds

Step 6b
©2006 Publications International, Ltd.
Step 6b

Step 6a: Turn the dog on its side.

Step 6b: Place the palm of your hand in the middle of the dog's chest.

Step 6c: Press for a count of "2," and release for a count of "1." Firm pressure is required. Repeat about 60 to 90 times per minute.

Step 6d: Alternately (after 30 seconds), hold the dog's mouth and lips closed and blow firmly into its nostrils. Blow for 3 seconds, take a deep breath, and repeat until you feel resistance or see the chest rise. Try to repeat this 10 to 20 times per minute.

Step 6e: After 1 minute, stop. Look at the chest for breathing movement, and feel for a heartbeat by placing your fingers about 2 inches behind the dog's elbow in the center of its chest.

Step 6f: If the dog's heart is not beating, continue CPR. If the heart starts beating but the dog is still not breathing, return to Step 5.

Step 7: Transport the dog immediately to the veterinarian. CPR or artificial respiration should be continued on the way to the veterinarian or until dog is breathing and its heart is beating without assistance.

Witnessing a seizure can be a scary thing, but don't panic. Use the tips on the next page to help you if your pet experiences convulsions or seizures.

Posted: Mon Jul 23, 2007 12:30 pm
by Murfins
That should totally be made into a sticky.

Posted: Mon Jul 23, 2007 12:49 pm
by pblove
We should all take CPR classes for our dogs.
Contact your local shelter and inquire about them?
If not, contact the Red Cross, they teach pet CPR periodically too.

Posted: Wed Aug 01, 2007 6:54 am
by ThompsonZ
Sorry for the slow reply. My internet was down and just got it back up. Thanks Alot for the list that is is very helpful :D

Posted: Sat Jan 26, 2008 8:21 pm
by reddog
This should be made a video to show what to do, reading and watching are two driffrent things. Hope I never have to deal with that, but you never know.

Posted: Tue Jul 01, 2008 9:44 pm
by TangoJr
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0AFrUiRIeVo

there are several others on YouTube.

Posted: Sun Dec 07, 2008 11:30 pm
by teddy
wow this is great info

Re: What do i do when my dog is choking?

Posted: Sun Nov 22, 2009 11:25 pm
by Pit Mama
Been there, done that! :)) The above info is great. When mine chokes I just open her mouth, reach in and pull it out and follow-up with a good drink of water. The coughing afterward is probably just irritation. I'm a vet tech and thankfully choking is not something we see too much in the hospital.

Re: What do i do when my dog is choking?

Posted: Thu Dec 31, 2009 7:13 pm
by N8swifey
Our girl was eating her raw too fast today and started to choke. (There is always someone supervising her) My husband was able to help her and she seems all right now. Seems to be some coughing and irritation and I was wondering if anyone knew what might be safe and soothing for her irritated throat. Any ideas? Thanks for the post!

Re: What do i do when my dog is choking?

Posted: Sun Jan 03, 2010 4:48 pm
by knitter4years
N8swifey wrote:Our girl was eating her raw too fast today and started to choke. (There is always someone supervising her) My husband was able to help her and she seems all right now. Seems to be some coughing and irritation and I was wondering if anyone knew what might be safe and soothing for her irritated throat. Any ideas? Thanks for the post!


Our foster dog Trixie is has a strong tendency to wolf down her food and she tends to cough a lot after. I'm glad to hear that the veterinary employee says not to many dogs suffer choking and need follow up to the hospital. I try to make sure her food and treats are smaller, and that she's calm before she gets the food. But that wouldn't help if she gulped down a chicken thigh she found.

Re: What do i do when my dog is choking?

Posted: Thu Dec 22, 2016 8:04 am
by petty254
Had the same problem with my pitbull a couple of months ago, he it took him two days to stop the coughing but i didn't know what to do then. Thank you for sharing this someone somewhere might be experiencing the same with their dogs. This should be a sticky, i agree :goodpost: