Clipping a Dog's Toenails

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natsa
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Clipping a Dog's Toenails

Postby natsa » Sat Sep 22, 2007 3:32 pm

Most of you guys do it yourself right..
I want to start doing this myself. Any tips. How to do's? I don't want to end up hurting Sunder.

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ZiggysMom
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Postby ZiggysMom » Sat Sep 22, 2007 3:56 pm

Does he have black or clear (pink) nails? It's a whole lot easier with pink nails...

The best way to start is not to clip yet. With all my vet clinic nail-trimming experience, the wilder the dog the more they get quicked because you can't be careful when you're going for a moving target. Start by training him to tolerate having his paws handled and seeing the clippers. I have Ziggy lie on his side. At first I just touched and held his paws while he was calm and sleepy, and praised and gave him treats for being still and allowing me to hold the paw steady. Then, I started bringing in the snippers and clipping just a tiny bit off at a time, but cutting often so he'd get used to it. As you clip, you'll get an idea for where the "quick" (the blood vessel and sensitive tissue inside the claw) is. In a light colored dog you can often see the pink center, but in a dog with black nails you have to guess or cut a little bit at a time (just a shaving) and stop when you start to get to the point where the claw looks kind of layered.

I'd say start training and start clipping, and be very conservative at first. The more you do it, the more confidence and experience you'll gain, and pretty soon you'll be good at it.

You can also do the Dremel tool technique. It's harder to quick a dog that way, so as long as the noise of the Dremel doesn't scare them. Just use a sanding drum on a Dremel tool and grind the nails down instead of clipping.

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Postby maximumrob » Sun Sep 23, 2007 1:52 pm

Keep your styptic powder nearby when you do this. Stop the bleeding of any nail you quick before moving on to another. It will hurt the dog, but they just lick and lick and lick if you hurt him too bad.

If you quick him too bad, they will bleed all over your house, or will break the clot open next time they run around.

However much you think you should take off, do a little less :)

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Postby Wesam » Sun Sep 23, 2007 6:48 pm

Mine has black nails. Last week was the first time I did it on my own. She has one pink nail and the rest are all black. So I cut that one first, realised how much I clipped from it and did the rest. I only clipped one too much but I blocked the bleeding with powder.

Now I look at the pink nail to determine if its time or not!

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dr961
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Postby dr961 » Sun Sep 23, 2007 10:11 pm

Wesam wrote:Mine has black nails. Last week was the first time I did it on my own. She has one pink nail and the rest are all black. So I cut that one first, realised how much I clipped from it and did the rest. I only clipped one too much but I blocked the bleeding with powder.
Now I look at the pink nail to determine if its time or not!


***That's a good idea, if your dog doesn't have all black nails. Just be sure to only clip a bit of the nail. Usually, when nails need doing, they will curve down and taper to points--cut off just the thinner part that curves down. Most dogs have at least one nail that's clear of light enough color for you to see the pinkish quick--that's the part you don't want to cut into. Better to do nails often, like weekly, than to let them get really long and then cut too much off. And always have some stiptic powder handy, just in case. Remember, it stings, so just quickly take a pinch and press it on the bleeding nail, hold it for a couple seconds, and hope you don't need it next time!

Start slow, and have treats handy to reward your dog so he associates nail trimming with something good when its done.

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Postby merriterrier » Sun Sep 23, 2007 10:39 pm

On the rare occasions I hit the quick, I use corn starch to stop the bleeding. It works as well as styptic powder and doesn't have any chemicals. I started this when we got our bird and the avian vet told us never to use styptic powder on her because it can cause blood poisoning in such a small animal.

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Postby 04100824 » Mon Sep 24, 2007 8:50 am

Reno has red claws, so his are easy. It'll be easier, still, if you wash their paws first, and the part that gets clipped is generally concave and easier to see if there's not dirt all stuck in there.

As far as getting your dog to tolerate the clipping, there is some great advice from Kayce Cover and a couple of personal experiences using this training in the last 2 or 3 pages of the Bridge and Target topic in the training section.

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Postby Adivina » Mon Sep 24, 2007 9:45 am

You can also use flour if you do not have any Quick-Stop type product handy. I've heard its actually preferable because the Quick-Stop has a tendency to sting and the flour does not.

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Postby akaspaddero » Mon Sep 24, 2007 10:09 am

i clip the pups, and two have black nails. I turn their foot to where I can see the underneath and see the quick. I do this every so often, but take them to the vet every 4-6 weeks for a good dremel. I so wish I could learn to dremel. That is my next goal.

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jewelsdaddy
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dremel

Postby jewelsdaddy » Mon Sep 24, 2007 10:24 am

I prefer the dremel. None of my dogs like the nail clippers at all.
If you start out real slow with the dremel you can get your dog accustomed to it.

I use the MiniMite 4.8 volt Model 750 Dremel it is rechargable. You can get it at Meijers or Walmart. I think I got it at Meijers. I use the 60 grit. I use it on low because on high it is uncomfortable for the dog. On low it is really quiet too. That is a reason I chose this model. Plus I love that it is cordless.

Jewel had a bad experience when she was younger with nail clipping (she got quik'd twice and that was enough of that crap for her) so that is why I like the Dremel for a first time dog. You can tell when you are reaching the quik. Now we have to lightly hold Jewel down to do her fronts but she will fall asleep while we do the backs. For some reason she hates the front.

This is a great site that shows how to dremel and how to start off with a first time dog.
http://homepages.udayton.edu/~merensjp/ ... index.html

On the left side of the page if you scroll down you will see "HOW TO DREMEL DOG NAILS"!

Hope this helps!! Good Luck and remember the key is to go slow and reward for good behavior!!

-Victoria

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akaspaddero
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Postby akaspaddero » Mon Sep 24, 2007 11:13 am

Thank you Victoria!

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jewelsdaddy
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no prob

Postby jewelsdaddy » Mon Sep 24, 2007 11:18 am

No problem! It's how I learned to be confident in using a dremel! :)


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