Petco Groom question AND Tooth care question

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UrsusArctos
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Petco Groom question AND Tooth care question

Postby UrsusArctos » Sun Jan 27, 2008 10:25 am

Does anyone here take their dog to Petco for grooming?

Oliver has an appointment on Friday, and I decided to pay a little extra to have his teeth cleaned- does anyone know if it's worth it? Am I paying 14 extra dollars just to get them brushed for a second and thats it?

On to tooth care- What products do you use to keep your dogs teeth clean? Do you generally brush your dogs teeth, or do you give treats instead? My local petstore sells this product: http://www.arcatapet.com/item.cfm?cat=13678 and I am wondering if anyone has ever used it? Or any recommendations?

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Postby Nicki » Sun Jan 27, 2008 11:05 am

I've never been to Petco for grooming, but I wouldn't think they could do much more than a good ol' brushing. Dice hates to have his teeth brushed, so I use bite blocks I got from my dentist to keep his mouth open in order to get it done thoroughly. Maybe Petco does, too, and it would be worth $14, if you can't do a good job yourself. Hopefully, Dice won't have to go under so many anesthesia cleanings if I can keep on top of things myself.

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Postby BabyReba » Sun Jan 27, 2008 11:24 am

considering i rarely even bathe the dogs, and when i do they have such short hair i can just throw them in my own tub, i have never used grooming services.

have you asked petco what it is they do for that $14? just brushing? brushing and scaling? if it's the former, i'd skip it, but if it's the latter, it's probably worth it if your dog has tartar buildup. i have a scaler at home, and i have scaled the dogs' teeth if they need it, but not very often.

for brushing, i have used a soft human toothbrush and some doggie toothpaste and just brushed. they all have pretty good teeth, though, so i don't even worry much about them . . . brush once in a while if i think of it, but that's about it.

i guess little dogs have more teeth issues, though so maybe you have to follow a more regimented protocol? dunno.

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Postby jestBC » Sun Jan 27, 2008 11:26 am

$14 is a little steep for tooth brushing! If I were you, I would invest that cash in a finger toothbrush and some doggie toothpaste, and just do it yourself.
We charge $5 for brushing which takes all of 1 minute...lol
"Dental treats" are absolutely ridiculous! Imagine your dentist said to you: "Here, eat these cookies to keep your teeth clean." Wouldn't you want to find a new dentist?!
Raw bones are natures toothbrushes. If Oliver is a kibble fed dog, he will probably need a dental cleaning when he gets a bit older..if possible, find a hygienist who does anesthetic -free cleanings; most dogs will tolerate it just fine. :thumbsup:

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Postby UrsusArctos » Sun Jan 27, 2008 11:38 am

jestBC wrote:.if possible, find a hygienist who does anesthetic -free cleanings; most dogs will tolerate it just fine. :thumbsup:


Oo, i didn't know that there were anesthetic free cleanings! That is my main concern- he is a brachycephalic dog, and I don't ever want to put him under unless its absolutely necessary.

Is there evidence that feeding a dog moist food is any better for their teeth?

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Postby UrsusArctos » Sun Jan 27, 2008 11:40 am

Oh, and the $14 extra also includes something like a special deep conditioner and one other feature, like an upgraded product- but really I am just interested in tooth care... as said, Ollie is a little dog and I've never met an old small dog that had all their teeth!

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Postby jestBC » Sun Jan 27, 2008 11:56 am

UrsusArctos wrote:Oh, and the $14 extra also includes something like a special deep conditioner and one other feature, like an upgraded product- but really I am just interested in tooth care... as said, Ollie is a little dog and I've never met an old small dog that had all their teeth!

If he's not matted, then you don't need conditioner, unless they use a really cheap shampoo the makes the coat dry. I would guess it's just a ploy to get your money.
A dental cleaning consists of scaling the tartar off the teeth. The dog just has to lie on his side and the hygienist holds the lip up to work. It's probably not the most comfortable thing in the world, but it's not painful and like you said, why knock them out if you don't have to?
Wet food is better than kibble for teeth, but there will still be build-up. Even raw fed dogs get some buildup as they age. Just give him lots of raw bones, brush his teeth regularly, and check his teeth (especially the back ones) for signs of tartar build-up. Like Babyreba said, you can scale the teeth yourself, but make sure you have some kind of antibacterial gum gel to prevent infection (scaling can cause bleeding in the gums.)
I will do a search to see if I can find a hygienist near you!

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Postby jestBC » Sun Jan 27, 2008 11:56 am

Ok, nm lol
Where do you live?

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Postby pitgrrl » Sun Jan 27, 2008 11:58 am

My newest experiment in doggie dental care is this stuff. I'm only about a week and a half into the experiment, but their teeth look a bit better so far.

Having fed kibble, kibble + wet food, homemade food, and now raw, the only difference I noticed was once I cut out grains. Wet or dry didn't make any difference, after about 3 years old they always had some tartar.

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Postby merriterrier » Sun Jan 27, 2008 12:15 pm

Ursus, I hope you don't mind if I ask a related question.

I need to have Ardy's teeth cleaned (I brush, but he needs the whole 9 yards) and was told he will have to be put under b/c he is a vicious little Rat Terrier who will bite if you mess with his teeth (also his teeth are very bad). Ardy is 12 and in fairly compromised health so I am concerned about having him anesthetized. Is there a procedure where he can be sedated, but not knocked out? or should I not worry about it.

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Postby Misskiwi67 » Sun Jan 27, 2008 12:24 pm

I would skip any scaling that doesn't involve anesthesia. The scaling can cause scratches in the surface of the teeth that give tartar new places to attach to and build on. Thats why a thorough cleaning AND POLISH under anesthesia is so important.

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Postby jestBC » Sun Jan 27, 2008 12:33 pm

merriterrier wrote:Ursus, I hope you don't mind if I ask a related question.

I need to have Ardy's teeth cleaned (I brush, but he needs the whole 9 yards) and was told he will have to be put under b/c he is a vicious little Rat Terrier who will bite if you mess with his teeth (also his teeth are very bad). Ardy is 12 and in fairly compromised health so I am concerned about having him anesthetized. Is there a procedure where he can be sedated, but not knocked out? or should I not worry about it.


Who told you Ardy would need sedation?
Have you tried something like Rescue Remedy? For dogs that are brats about being handled, we will always try that, or suggest a dose of Benedryl beforehand, which tends to calm. Our hygienist also uses T-Touch and gentle restraint techniques (holding the legs that are on the table up, and scruffing.) More often than not we are able to do dogs who's owners have said were "going to be impossible."
Being the age he is I would try every option before going ahead with the anesthetic.
However, if his teeth are REALLY bad, he may need extractions before a cleaning can be done...which he will obviously have to be put out for.

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Postby UrsusArctos » Sun Jan 27, 2008 2:06 pm

Hmm, Ok thanks for everyones input.

Misskiwi- how often do you reccommed a sedated tooth cleaning? Oliver doesn't need one now for sure, hes just a pup :) But is that important later in life?

It makes me VERY uneasy because I had a friend who lost his beloved pug under anesthesia tooth cleaning... and I would feel so awful to put Ollies life in danger for a non-emergency sedation. (thats why I'm trying to figure out preventative measures to take)

Anyone who has questions about teeth- hop on in! I don't mind :)

And I live in Arcata, CA 95521

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Postby BighornTermite » Sun Jan 27, 2008 3:07 pm

UrsusArctos wrote: how often do you reccommed a sedated tooth cleaning? 1


Great question. I brush Zoey's teeth roughly once a week...usually in the far recesses of a corner closet (she tries to get away) lol

But how often, and starting when, is it a good idea to put your dog under and have it done thoroughly/professionally? (A friend of mine got 17 years out of her cocker spaniel and claims a yearly/near yearly deep cleaning prolonged the dog's health.)

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Postby Misskiwi67 » Sun Jan 27, 2008 3:22 pm

Small dogs may need a professional cleaning yearly, and may need to start as early as 2 years of age due to the poor conformation of the face. Other dogs may never need a professional cleaning. 80% of pets over 4 years of age have some level of dental disease however, so its rare for a dog to go without.

If your dog is going to need large amounts of dental work over their lifetime, then choose vets carefully! Pick a vet that performs dental x-rays, and has constant monitoring throughout the procedure. Its not uncommon for dental procedures to be performed without any monitoring at all, with only the technician who is performing the procedure (distracted) to monitor the level of anesthesia. Also ask for short-acting induction agents such as propofol (more $$) that allow your pet to wake up quickly and help prevent the normal complications associated with being brachycephalic.


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