Petco Groom question AND Tooth care question

Talk about diets, exercise, and disease.
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UrsusArctos
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Postby UrsusArctos » Sun Jan 27, 2008 3:25 pm

Thanks for all that info. I'll consider taking him in when he's around 2.

So until then, just weekly(ish) brushing is best? Add some raw bones in... so are the chew treats pretty much bunk?

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pitgrrl
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Postby pitgrrl » Sun Jan 27, 2008 3:29 pm

In my experience, brushing does little to nothing if you're not doing every 2-3 days. I really wish I'd started doing it when my dogs were younger, as their teeth now are kind of yucky.

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Misskiwi67
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Postby Misskiwi67 » Sun Jan 27, 2008 3:38 pm

Totally agree with pitgrrl on this one... Every other day or every day is best. Anything is better than nothing however. Raw bones are great, but really anything that forces your dog to CHEW (including chew treats) is helpful. Also, the science diet T/D is awesome. You can give just a couple kibbles a day to a small dog and its almost as good as brushing 2-3 times a week. I'd never feed it as a staple diet, but its healthier than most treats available at petsmart.

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jestBC
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Postby jestBC » Mon Jan 28, 2008 7:33 pm

Misskiwi67 wrote:I would skip any scaling that doesn't involve anesthesia. The scaling can cause scratches in the surface of the teeth that give tartar new places to attach to and build on. Thats why a thorough cleaning AND POLISH under anesthesia is so important.

Polishing with prophy is part of the anesthetic free procedure as well, for the record. It is exactly the same procedure, sans drugs. :thumbsup:

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Misskiwi67
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Postby Misskiwi67 » Mon Jan 28, 2008 8:07 pm

jestBC wrote:
Misskiwi67 wrote:I would skip any scaling that doesn't involve anesthesia. The scaling can cause scratches in the surface of the teeth that give tartar new places to attach to and build on. Thats why a thorough cleaning AND POLISH under anesthesia is so important.

Polishing with prophy is part of the anesthetic free procedure as well, for the record. It is exactly the same procedure, sans drugs. :thumbsup:


The teeth are cleaned with an ultrasonic cleaner, and polished with a high speed rotating head? The teeth are evaluated by a veterinarian and given a medical record with plaque and gingivitis scores, as well as evaluated for hidden pockets and root exposure that might indicate teeth should be treated or pulled?

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jestBC
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Postby jestBC » Mon Jan 28, 2008 8:45 pm

Misskiwi67 wrote:
jestBC wrote:
Misskiwi67 wrote:I would skip any scaling that doesn't involve anesthesia. The scaling can cause scratches in the surface of the teeth that give tartar new places to attach to and build on. Thats why a thorough cleaning AND POLISH under anesthesia is so important.

Polishing with prophy is part of the anesthetic free procedure as well, for the record. It is exactly the same procedure, sans drugs. :thumbsup:


The teeth are cleaned with an ultrasonic cleaner, and polished with a high speed rotating head? The teeth are evaluated by a veterinarian and given a medical record with plaque and gingivitis scores, as well as evaluated for hidden pockets and root exposure that might indicate teeth should be treated or pulled?

EXCUSE ME< MOSTLY the same technique.
A lot of vets still don't use an ultrasonic scaler; they still use a manual one. Slower and probably less effective, but still effective!
Yes, a high speed rotating polisher is used.
Yes, the teeth are evaluated for gingivitis and plaque, not by a vet, but by a trained hygienist, who can essentially note the same things.
If any problems are present (loose teeth, severe inflammation etc) the client is referred to their veterinarian before any cleaning is done.
Anesthetic free does not mean anti-vet. It is simply an alternative for people who want regular deep cleanings of their pet's teeth without the use of unnecessary drugs.

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Misskiwi67
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Postby Misskiwi67 » Mon Jan 28, 2008 9:12 pm

jestBC wrote:It is simply an alternative for people who want regular deep cleanings of their pet's teeth without the use of unnecessary drugs.


I apologize. Having performed multiple dental procedures myself, and being familiar with only the most high-tech equipment, including dental x-rays, it is my personal belief that drugs are not unnecessary, but are in fact essential for a full evaluation of the mouth. I cannot believe you could possibly get an adequate evaluation of even a slightly diseased mouth without anesthesia. Considering 80% of pets over the age of 4 years have dental disease, this means that the majority of clients need more than just a quick evaluation. If you aren't probing every part of the teeth and gums, then you're missing important information.

If a vet isn't using an ultrasonic scaler, then you're better off getting a non-anesthetic procedure. Everyone should do their research and know what they are paying for prior to signing up their pet for a dental prophy, especially an anesthetic procedure.

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Postby kcalbat » Mon Jan 28, 2008 9:14 pm

I would brush them yourself. Its WAAAAAAY cheaper. Preventative measures are always a good thing. I brush my Maltese's teeth everyday as he is only a year and his teeth are already looking bad. So a few months ago. I started brushing them myself.

Most dogs like the taste of poultry toothpaste. Small dogs dont take to it as easily however, so I made sure to make it where Skwooshee WANTED the toothbrush.

I had him sniff the toothbrush and paste and then I had him chase the toothbrush like a toy so he thought it was a game. Then I brushed his teeth for like two seconds and made a huge whopping deal out of it with praises and whatnot. I pretty much do that every time and now he loves loves loves having his teeth brushed. It helps if he is a little hungry.

I cannot leave toothpaste out because my big dogs will take off with it and eat it!

Good luck.

Oh and conditioner is really good for the coat if you keep it a little longer. I would pay the 5 bucks or so for conditioner and just do the toothbrushing yourself. I recently cut my Maltese down and still use conditioner everytime, it helps with static and prevents matting around his face, tail, and legs where I have left him a little longer.

A note about grooming salons. Petcos and Petsmarts differ between every store. I always hear very bad things about both of them and good things about some. But it is in my opinion that you have to find someone you like, that clicks with Ollie, and does a good job and then stick with them. That way you get consistent results.

(btw, I work at Petsmart so I am not saying anything bad about having someone else groom your dog. Oh and I never try and sell toothbrushing even though we charge 10 dollars. It really is a waste if you are noth doing it at least every 36 hrs)

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Postby BighornTermite » Tue Jan 29, 2008 5:24 pm

"Hidden pockets"? "Root exposure?" "Gingivitis"? "Unnecessary drugs"? "Ultrasonic scaler"? Teeth that are "kind of yucky"?

Crap, I'm gonna start flossing Zoey's teeth daily.

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Misskiwi67
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Postby Misskiwi67 » Tue Jan 29, 2008 5:25 pm

BighornTermite wrote:"Hidden pockets"? "Root exposure?" "Gingivitis"? "Unnecessary drugs"? "Ultrasonic scaler"? Teeth that are "kind of yucky"?

Crap, I'm gonna start flossing Zoey's teeth daily.


Haha... there are few things nastier than a dogs mouth, and few things more rewarding to clean!!

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Postby OrsonDogge » Thu Jan 31, 2008 10:14 pm

Orson eats a raw diet, he's never had a "dental" and he is 3 years old.
Its true, 80% of dogs by the age of 3 have periodontal disease. :sad:

looky at these pearly whites!
Image

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UrsusArctos
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Postby UrsusArctos » Thu Jan 31, 2008 11:11 pm

Misskiwi- my main concern about the procedure is putting the dog under anesthetic, and would prefer to not do so, since, as I said, my friends pug died under routine cleaning procedure.

Do you, as a vet, recommend the yearly teeth cleaning for bracycephalic dog? Even in older dogs?

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Postby poopster » Fri Feb 01, 2008 12:19 pm

I groomed for petco before. I hated it. I groom all my own critters or if I am lazy I will pass it off on my mom (like my Persian its a pain in the ass) it makes her feel important haha. I do Honey's teeth once a week. I also do manicures LOL I have been doing it since she was a baby so its more like a fun game of "pretty". Some of our older dogs had terrible issues with their mouth and feet being cleaned or clipped some times even touched. I can see what the vet used but one of ours always needed a mild sedative that didn't really knock them out for long. Bad teeth can cause serious health issues so finding the right way that works (since each dog is different) is awesome if you can.

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Misskiwi67
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Postby Misskiwi67 » Fri Feb 01, 2008 12:26 pm

UrsusArctos wrote:Misskiwi- my main concern about the procedure is putting the dog under anesthetic, and would prefer to not do so, since, as I said, my friends pug died under routine cleaning procedure.

Do you, as a vet, recommend the yearly teeth cleaning for bracycephalic dog? Even in older dogs?


Thats an absolute resounding YES! If your dog has dental disease...

I've seen chronic elevations in white blood cells and liver enzymes that completely resolved after a dental procedure. Dental health DOES effect the overall well being of the whole animal, and neglecting the mouth out of fear is only going to result in more problems long term.


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