Urgent quesiotn

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fr4nnie
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Urgent quesiotn

Postby fr4nnie » Mon Jan 28, 2008 9:57 pm

Quick question.

When I got home today from work around 1pm I found a slice of bread in my small backyard.
Then inside my house in the hallway I found this sticky greenish thing.

<a><img src="http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e256/fr4nn/Picture005-1.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>
<a><img src="http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e256/fr4nn/Picture004-2.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>

I am clueless about poisons, hopefully it is not what I am thinking it could be, but when weird things like this happen you always get to think thinks that you wish werent true.

Hopefully someone can help me figure it out what that is. I am alone right now, I'll wait for my dad to get home to ask him, but in the meanwhile I am here seeeking help.

All dogs are fine, I have no idea why would someone do this if it is poison.
My dogs are inside dogs, they only go out to potty, or play but they rarely stay there for more than an hour.

What could have happened is that the next door neighbors have two dog that stay outside 24 hours a day without any human contact they are always barking, howling, crying. Myabe someone contacted the police about the barking and they thought it was us, or maybe someone tried to poison their dogs and they've thrown the bread to our backyard.
Theie dogs stopped crying for the past 2 days, so I am guessing something might have happened.

Hopefully this is all in my head, but if it is true, OH MAN, geu out of my way.

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Postby *leenie* » Mon Jan 28, 2008 10:03 pm

I have no idea what that is. Maybe your vet can have it tested for something.

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Postby violet » Mon Jan 28, 2008 10:03 pm

I cant tell you what it is but frankly, id call teh police and file a police report on the assumption someone tried to poison your dogs.

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Postby AriesGodofWar » Mon Jan 28, 2008 10:04 pm

violet wrote:I cant tell you what it is but frankly, id call teh police and file a police report on the assumption someone tried to poison your dogs.


I would call the police and they will have to test it as part of their investigation. From now on, no doggies outside unattended. As sad as it is, until you know, I would be walking the yard before they go out.

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Postby SrtStealth » Mon Jan 28, 2008 10:09 pm

Looks like rat poison

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Postby Beowulf » Mon Jan 28, 2008 10:09 pm

I don't have any idea what that is but I've had a dog poisoned with antifreeze. It's a horrible death.

Follow everyone's advice. Assume someone has tried to poison your dogs. Walk the yard before they go out. And don't ever leave them unattended.

How did the green sticky thing get INSIDE your house? Any idea? :frown:

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Postby gooeydog » Mon Jan 28, 2008 10:13 pm

There are a number of mouse/rat poisons that come in greenish blocks, so that would be enough to have me concerned. It can't hurt to call your vet, let them know they may have gotten ahold of some mouse poison, and see if they recommend them being put on vitamin K as a precautionary measure, or they may recommend that you bring them in at some point in the near future for a clotting profile. I don't know if there's anyplace that can do testing on it, but it wouldn't hurt to call either the police or animal control (not sure who would deal with it) and see if there's any way of finding out what is is and getting something on file if it is poison (also make sure that no one in your house has put anything out for mice before pursuing it further).

In the meantime, don't leave your dogs out unattended, and make sure you either check the yard before letting them out, or take them out on leash, just in case.
http://www.doityourself.com/invt/u632313
Last edited by gooeydog on Mon Jan 28, 2008 10:39 pm, edited 2 times in total.

msvette2u

Postby msvette2u » Mon Jan 28, 2008 10:13 pm

There is a type of rat poison that is green.

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Postby Libby » Mon Jan 28, 2008 10:35 pm

I use rat poison called 'TomCat' that looks JUST like that, but comes in little brick forms. I would call the police if I were you. That is deffinitely something to be concerned about.


Ket

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fr4nnie
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Postby fr4nnie » Mon Jan 28, 2008 11:19 pm

Thanks everyone for the great advices, I'll be calling the police and aks what can we do, I have no proof of who did it, so I am not sure if the police will do anything.

I am already taking all precautions, my backyard is small, no grass only concrete, so if there is anything I'll be able to find it quick.
They are not dehydrated, their gums look fine, only one thing is that one of the dogs is driking lots of water, probably it is just my imagination, she always drinks lots of water. But I have my eye open, for any behavior change, right now she is playig with the puppy.

I now they need to consume a big quantity to get intoxicated, I am mostly concerned with my 8lb dachshund, the other dogs are bigger so they need more than my dachshund. But she is also fine. I just can imagem why this is happening. My dogs bark but only for short periods, we don't allow it, and they only bark when they are playing. They are never outside bugging anyone.

Does anyone has any experience with cameras outside, right now there is only 3 poeple in the house 2 are away for a month, so pretty much noone stays home, we all have full time jobs, so it will be hard to take picture of whomever is doing this.

I am thinking about writing a letter to our neighbors with the dogs, and let them know that we contacted the police, because if it is them they will know better and not try again, or if it is not them just to check their yard for anything that shouldn't be there and wahct out for their dogs.

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fr4nnie
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Postby fr4nnie » Mon Jan 28, 2008 11:30 pm

How did the green sticky thing get INSIDE your house? Any idea?


I have no idea how it got inside, I am praying that it got stuck on their paws, the thing is sticky. I am impressed they didn't eat the bread, I think I found it first, that's how and hopefully thats why.

We just moved here, its been 2 months and a half. and we still got 10 months to stay here. But if I find out who is doing this I am going to destroy this persons life.

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Postby innocence621 » Mon Jan 28, 2008 11:41 pm

Looks like rat poison to me, be careful because sometimes it takes a few days for signs to show and it may be too late. I don't think it takes much.
XXX - Emergency! XX - Highly Dangerous X - Dangerous

Poisons intended to kill rats, mice, gophers, moles and other mammalian pests are among the most common and deadly of small animal toxins. Since rodent and other pests and our companion animal dogs and cats are all mammals, it follows that substances highly poisonous to the pests would be just as lethal to our pets, and indeed that is the case. In the 1990 AAPCC report, 8% of all non-drug toxin exposures resulted from rodenticides and of 425 fatalities, 60 (14%) of deaths were subsequent to these poisons. Commonly, owners have all but forgotten the old rat poison in the garage cabinet until it gets knocked onto the ground and the dog has eaten it. Or on farms or stables, rat poison is left in what seems like a safe place to attract only the rats and then the empty chewed container is seen outside the doghouse. It cannot be too highly stressed that rodenticides are highly toxic and any such poisons designed to kill small mammals need to be carefully contained in closed metal cabinets or high on stable shelving. The poisons usually come in flimsy cardboard containers and any dog, puppy or cat can chew through the container to get at the bait. Unfortunately, every year far too many do just that.

Rodenticides are classified according to both their basic ingredient compounds and by how they act on their target. These categories include: Anti-coagulant rodenticides, cholecalciferol, strychnine, zinc phosphide, bromethalin, compound 1080 and more. The most common rodenticide poisoning seen in veterinary practice is that of the anti-coagulant rodenticides. These poisons - with ingredient names like warfarin, fumarin, diphacinone, bromadiolone - act by interfering with the animal's ability to utilize Vitamin K. One of they key roles of Vitamin K is in the production of coagulation factors in the body which cause blood to clot when necessary. Although we are not aware of it, normal physiological processes require blood to clot many times a day in our bodies and that of our pets. Without the necessary coagulation factors, normal minor bleeding in the body goes unchecked which, without treatment, becomes major bleeding, with blood loss anemia, hemorrhage and death resulting. With most anti-coagulant rodenticides, signs are not seen until 3-5 days after the pet has ingested the poison. Clinical signs include weakness, difficult breathing, pale mucous membranes, and bleeding from the nose.

Other types of rodenticides have different mechanisms of action with some (i.e., strychnine and bromethalin) causing neurological signs such as incoordination, seizures and others cardiac failure (i.e., cholecalciferol). If accidental ingestion of rat poison is suspected, contact your veterinary clinic immediately, even if your dog or cat is showing no obvious signs of being ill. Be sure, if possible, to bring the poison container in to the clinic in order to determine the specific toxin and provide the best treatment. Early recognition is critical as some poisons, particularly the anti-coagulant rodenticides, can be successfully treated if the poisoning is caught early and treated appropriately.

http://www.avma.org/careforanimals/anim ... oninfo.asp

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gooeydog
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Postby gooeydog » Mon Jan 28, 2008 11:53 pm

It doesn't really take much poison for them to be affected, and it can take several days before you actually see effects. I generally tend towards the conservative side when it comes to medicating my dogs, but if I had any indication my dog(s) may have gotten into rodent poison, I'd be contacting their vet about starting vitamin K supplementation and checking to see if bloodwork was indicated.

This is something we see fairly commonly at the animal hospital I work at, and generally, by the time dogs begin to show symptoms, they are VERY sick (I can recall several which have died), as opposed to dogs which are treated quickly and kept on vit K, who seem to rarely have problems.
Rodenticides

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Postby Leslie H » Tue Jan 29, 2008 5:06 pm

We had a horrible rat problem at our old house, and finally resorted to poison (we were desperate). We wound up finding a partially eaten rat corpse. We brought the dogs we thought might have eaten it to the vet, and got them doses of Vitamin K. Better safe than sorry.

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Postby pblove » Tue Jan 29, 2008 5:19 pm

I had a cat eat a mouse that had died from poison. I had been living on that farm for several years and had never put any poison out, so it was left over from previous renters.
The cat died, even with vet care/ mega doses of Vit-K.
The moral of this post is this:
a mouse cannot eat very much, so if the poison managed to kill my cat, it won't take much to cause serious damage to your dogs. It is far better to be safe then sorry.


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