blackish tarry poop

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Maryellen
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blackish tarry poop

Postby Maryellen » Thu May 01, 2008 6:40 pm

ok, so what does blackish tarry poop mean?? its not firm, but rather loose, almost black but not quite black, and kinda tarry ?

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Postby Maryellen » Thu May 01, 2008 6:48 pm

http://www.petplace.com/dogs/melena-blo ... page5.aspx

Melena is the presence of digested blood in the feces and makes the stools appear black and tarry. Melena is different from fresh blood in the stool (hematochezia). Melena may represent a severe, life-threatening illness, and should not be ignored. It must especially be addressed if it persists or worsens.

Melena develops when bleeding occurs into the stomach or small intestines. The bleeding must be high in the intestinal tract in order for the blood to be digested and become discolored. Bleeding into the colon or rectum (hematochezia) appears as fresh blood in the stool.

General Causes



Infectious agents

Certain drugs

Cancer

Foreign bodies in the stomach or intestines

Infiltrative and inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases

Ingestion of blood

Coagulopathies (bleeding disorders)

Metabolic and other diseases that cause gast

rointestinal ulceration

Hemorrhagic gastroenteritis (HGE)

Perioperative hemorrhage (bleeding associated with surgery on the intestinal tract)

Gastrointestinal ischemia (lack of blood supply)

Ingestion of heavy metals (uncommon causes)

What to Watch For


Dark, almost black stools

Diarrhea

Vomiting

Pale gums

Other areas of bleeding or bruising on the body

Weight loss

Poor appetite

Excessive drinking or urinating

Excessive urinating

A thorough history and physical examination are often helpful in determining if melena is present and in suggesting an underlying cause. To determine the exact cause, additional tests are usually necessary and include the following:


Complete blood count (CBC)

Biochemical profile

Urinalysis

Fecal examination

Abdominal and chest radiographs (X-rays)

Serology for certain infectious diseases

Coagulation profile

Abdominal ultrasonography

Upper gastrointestinal barium series

Endoscopy

Melena usually indicates the presence of significant upper gastrointestinal disease, although occasionally other diseases (such as clotting disorders, ingestion of blood, etc.) unrelated to the gastrointestinal tract may present with melena. The classic appearance of melena is black, shiny, sticky, foul-smelling feces with a tarry consistency. Melena may be seen as the only clinical sign, although other systemic signs often accompany it.

Ingestion of blood must be ruled out, including swallowing blood from the oral cavity or respiratory tract, and licking blood from a wound. A careful history and thorough physical examination of these patients is essential. The presence of melena generally warrants hospitalization, extensive diagnostic testing, and supportive care. It is best to determine the underlying cause and treat the specific problem.

Causes

There are many potential causes for melena.

The most common causes are usually diseases of the gastrointestinal tract that create ulcerations or cause bleeding into the tract. Ingestion of blood or bleeding from clotting abnormalities can also cause melena. It is important to determine a cause, as specific treatment is necessary to successfully treat patients with melena.


Infectious disorders such as intestinal parasites, viral, bacterial, and/or fungal infections should be ruled out.


Intestinal irritation and ulceration may occur with the administration of certain drugs, particularly corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs).


Gastrointestinal ulcerations or erosions commonly produce melena. Such ulcers may occur following acute gastric dilatation and volvulus (twisting of the stomach), heat stroke, overwhelming body infections, the overproduction of stomach acid, shock, anaphylaxis, and as a side effect of some cancers.


Gastrointestinal tumors or foreign bodies can cause bleeding and melena.


Certain metabolic diseases, such as kidney and liver failure, pancreatitis and hypoadrenocorticism (Addison's disease) can cause bleeding into the intestinal tract.


Inflammation of the walls of the intestines (inflammatory bowel disease) can be associated with melena.


Ingested blood should be considered as a cause when bleeding is present in the oral cavity or respiratory tract, or when the animal has been witnessed licking a bleeding wound.


Coagulopathies (abnormalities in blood clotting) should also be considered, especially if there is evidence of bleeding from other body sites.


Hemorrhagic gastroenteritis (HGE) is a syndrome seen in dogs whose cause is unknown. It usually causes acute diarrhea with fresh blood in it, and vomiting, hematemesis (vomiting blood), and melena can also be seen.


Any time surgery is performed on the upper gastrointestinal tract, bleeding may occur into the tract. Melena can then appear 12-72 hours after surgery. This form of melena should be very transient.


Gastrointestinal ischemia (lack of blood supply) secondary to shock, volvulus (torsion), intussusception (telescoping of the bowel into itself), or infarction (blockage of circulation to an area) can cause death of the lining of the intestines and bleeding into the intestines with subsequent melena.

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Re: blackish tarry poop

Postby Chili Peppers » Thu May 01, 2008 6:49 pm

Maryellen wrote:ok, so what does blackish tarry poop mean?? its not firm, but rather loose, almost black but not quite black, and kinda tarry ?


Hmm... bleeding somewhere in the intestinal tract ?

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Allie
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Postby Allie » Thu May 01, 2008 7:03 pm

I was always told that black/tarry poops or vomit could suggest digestive blood. Red blood is usually from intestinal irritation.
Please update us if/when you're going to see a vet.
Good luck.

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Postby pitgrrl » Thu May 01, 2008 7:18 pm

What I've generally been told by vets on the numerous occasions I've had to discuss bloody poop with them is when you see red, you can wait and see, when you see black and tarry you want to get things checked out ASAP.

That said, Streets has taken some weird, black poops, often when getting over an upset stomach or colitis, which sent me rushing to the vet only to discover they did not have blood in them.

I hope it all turns out, let us know what happens.

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Postby Maryellen » Thu May 01, 2008 7:22 pm

i just cant win.

well, she goes in saturday for an ultrasound on her kidneys, but i will be calling the vet tomorrow morning when they open to see if i can switch rufus' pink eye appt for 5:45 and instead take ruby and a poop sample.... she is acting fine, playing, biting, jumping, not hot or anything, so i will see if tomorrow i can switch, i dont see why not.. what will they look for when i bring her new poop sample in? she was in last night, and i posted her blood results in the uti thread, so i am really confused here.... so are the vets with her bloodwork and urine work as well... if anyone wants me to email them the blood work from last night i can just give me your email.

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Postby Maryellen » Thu May 01, 2008 7:22 pm

BUN - elevated at 31
creatine - normal
alkalon - evevated
phosphorus - elevated
white blood cell- no elevation- normal
she is also anemic 30% which they dont understand...

msvette2u

Postby msvette2u » Thu May 01, 2008 7:25 pm

Anemic!?? She's bleeding in her stomach, if her poo is tarry, that would cause anemia!!
Just scoop some up and put it in a plastic bag and bring it in, in the AM!!
Oh gosh...
:(

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Postby pitgrrl » Thu May 01, 2008 7:27 pm

She was on antibiotics for the UTI which were upsetting her digestion, right?

If that's the case, because of the experiences with Streets that I mentioned above, I'd think they might be related. :dunno:

msvette2u

Postby msvette2u » Thu May 01, 2008 7:28 pm

Sorry, I meant, just scoop up some poo, they can test it without seeing her...let's hope it is not blood but it sounds like it might be, since she's been having the other issues (the antibiotic).
Maybe it's just a reaction to eating her own poo :(

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Maryellen
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Postby Maryellen » Thu May 01, 2008 7:30 pm

her poop was NORMAL prior to saturday.. which was when she got 2 full doses of clavamox..she gets one in the morning and one at night, and her poop has gone downhill since then, first it was runny , and normal color.. now tonight its blackish/tarrish.. and soupyish... i didnt feel thru it, but its more of a blackish color with some ligher black in it... i have been giving her acidophilus powder per the vet as i told him she had runny poop from the clavamox so he said to give her acidophilus to settle her stomach, its from Eagle Pack he gave it to me last night.

i am going to stop the clavamox tomorrow until i call the vet to get her in tomorrow night.. i will drop off a stool sample tomorrow morning on my way to work as they open at 8.

below is her blood work.


Image

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Postby Maryellen » Thu May 01, 2008 7:31 pm

she hasnt eaten her poop now in over a day, since i started giving her the eagle pack acidophilus ....

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Postby Maryellen » Thu May 01, 2008 7:34 pm

here is the link to the bloodwork from last night...

http://photos.imageevent.com/princess21 ... cument.pdf

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Leslie H
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Postby Leslie H » Thu May 01, 2008 7:55 pm

Hemorrhagic gastroenteritis (HGE) is a syndrome seen in dogs whose cause is unknown. It usually causes acute diarrhea with fresh blood in it, and vomiting, hematemesis (vomiting blood), and melena can also be seen.

I'm going to go ahead and scare you, I lost a dog to HGE. There were many other factors, she was pregnant and had gestational diabetes, but this weakened her resistance/immune system, making her vulnerable to bacteria that dogs are normally resistant to, my vet mentioned bacteria from spoiled meat. She had no obvious symptoms, we thought she was slowing down because it was hot out, and she was due to whelp in a couple days. She had no vomiting or bright blood in her stool that we knew of, but we used to let dogs out loose in our big yard in those days. She had one horrible poop, as she laid at my feet under a table, simultaneous with her becoming unconscious.
So, unlike your dog, this dog wasn't acting fine, we just didn't recognize why shy was slow and draggy. But, tarry stools should be taken very seriously.

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Maryellen
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Postby Maryellen » Thu May 01, 2008 7:59 pm

dont worry leslie, she is going to the vet tomorrow... is it ok to wait till tomorrow, or should i take her to the ER vet tonight? she was fine until she started taking the clavamox.. i can go to the ER tonight, if you feel i should, what will they do for her?


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