Injuries sustained from weight pulling?

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ellie@ny
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Re: Injuries sustained from weight pulling?

Postby ellie@ny » Sun Aug 28, 2011 8:41 pm

Leslie H wrote:Image


I always start laughing when I see this picture...lol lol

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Re: Injuries sustained from weight pulling?

Postby Mooresmajestic » Mon Aug 29, 2011 11:05 pm

I know of 1 dog (a GSD) that tore a cruciate, but said dog weaves side to side down the track (I think the dog actually fell off the track, but I wasn't at the pull it happened at so I don't know for sure). And another (from the same house) injured its back, but had a history of back issues.

I will continue to pull my dog (tho sadly not in UKC) until she doesn't think its fun anymore.
I also know my dog and know when to say when.

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Re: Injuries sustained from weight pulling?

Postby TahsSunny » Tue Aug 30, 2011 7:19 pm

Mooresmajestic wrote:I know of 1 dog (a GSD) that tore a cruciate, but said dog weaves side to side down the track (I think the dog actually fell off the track, but I wasn't at the pull it happened at so I don't know for sure). And another (from the same house) injured its back, but had a history of back issues.

I will continue to pull my dog (tho sadly not in UKC) until she doesn't think its fun anymore.
I also know my dog and know when to say when.


Just wondering, the dog with back issues, why would they make the dog pull if he/she had back issues?. If this isn't the case then sorry, I'm just getting the impression the dog does or did weight pull?.

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Re: Injuries sustained from weight pulling?

Postby GSDBulldog » Tue Aug 30, 2011 7:42 pm


Just wondering, the dog with back issues, why would they make the dog pull if he/she had back issues?


Probably the same reason people set out to title 9 month old puppies (In the ADBA, unsure of the age restrictions with other organizations).

As others have stated, I have personally not witnessed a weight pull related injury beyond broken nails/torn pads (Or, in my dog's case, a thorn in a his toe during practice). I have seen dogs deteriorate early on in life (3-5 yrs)- but these were poorly-built, "XXL pit bulls" that were bred and used exclusively for weight pull (And thus were started early. These dogs were typically not trained appropriately and often had erratic pulling-styles which can increase the chance of injury).

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Leslie H
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Re: Injuries sustained from weight pulling?

Postby Leslie H » Tue Aug 30, 2011 8:01 pm

Going back to agility, I see a range of when different trainers introduce different obstacles and training challenges. Some will not ask dogs for any real jumping until close to a year, or introduce weave poles until the dog is fairly mature physically. I've seen some dogs competing that are grossly overweight, or have structural issues that put them at risk. Weight pull, like many sports or tasks involving animals, should be done properly. Not every dog is cut out for it. I have to say I see more dogs being hurt by well intended pet owners who let them get very overweight, and then run them on pavement, or have them tear cruciates chasing tennis balls when they are completely out of shape, then I have in any dog sport.

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Re: Injuries sustained from weight pulling?

Postby Amie » Wed Aug 31, 2011 7:20 am

Leslie H wrote:I have to say I see more dogs being hurt by well intended pet owners who let them get very overweight, and then run them on pavement, or have them tear cruciates chasing tennis balls when they are completely out of shape, then I have in any dog sport.


:goodpost:

Of all the torn knees I've seen personally, all but one of them have been on pure pet (ie, non-sporting) dogs. The one I saw who was a sport dog had SEVERAL knee issues, ran agility, and was also disturbingly overweight. I don't know what she was being fed that kept her at that weight with as much agility as she ran, but I'd bet money that it was her weight (and possibly her conformation, most likely the combination of those) rather than the sport that had anything to do with her injuries.

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Re: Injuries sustained from weight pulling?

Postby Mooresmajestic » Wed Aug 31, 2011 11:45 am

GSDBulldog wrote:

Just wondering, the dog with back issues, why would they make the dog pull if he/she had back issues?


Probably the same reason people set out to title 9 month old puppies


This.

It happens when people care more about the letters surrounding a dogs name than they do for the dog that is attached to that name. Unfortunately there will always be people like this in any sport.

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Re: Injuries sustained from weight pulling?

Postby pblove » Wed Aug 31, 2011 8:30 pm

Ellie your dogs look fantstic and that pic of Mimi in her red collar is awsome :inlove:

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ellie@ny
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Re: Injuries sustained from weight pulling?

Postby ellie@ny » Wed Aug 31, 2011 8:40 pm

Aw thanks!

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Sarah
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Re: Injuries sustained from weight pulling?

Postby Sarah » Thu Sep 01, 2011 5:27 pm

The key would be mostly to not pull dogs that look like this.

Image

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Re: Injuries sustained from weight pulling?

Postby ProudMommy77 » Thu Sep 01, 2011 5:43 pm

Sarah wrote:The key would be mostly to not pull dogs that look like this.

Image


but they do. There is one dog that I swear it walked on it's pasterns. Leslie and Ellie know who I am talking about.

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Sarah
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Re: Injuries sustained from weight pulling?

Postby Sarah » Thu Sep 01, 2011 5:49 pm

I think it's very likely that the dog in that photo does do weight pull, though I couldn't say for sure. I snapped the photo because it was among the worst structure I'd ever seen in my life. If anything, the poor quality photo makes it look better than it really is. I wasn't at a weight pull, though.

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ellie@ny
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Re: Injuries sustained from weight pulling?

Postby ellie@ny » Thu Sep 01, 2011 8:53 pm

ProudMommy77 wrote:
Sarah wrote:The key would be mostly to not pull dogs that look like this.

Image


but they do. There is one dog that I swear it walked on it's pasterns. Leslie and Ellie know who I am talking about.


I sure do Jen... :-/
Sadly I have seen a lot worse, then the one in this picture...I would call this as a normal conformation for big dogs... :-/ VERY rare to see a well built, fit to his size big dog..
It's quiet disgusting, how overweight most of the big dogs are...When I was at the APA Natl's last year,dogs over 80-90 # are probably all overweight...and I'm not talking about 5#...and of course on the other hand, we have the wayyyy too leaned out little dogs...

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Sarah
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Re: Injuries sustained from weight pulling?

Postby Sarah » Thu Sep 01, 2011 10:12 pm

I'm not sure the photo shows how bad the structure really is, since it looks as though some of the faults might be caused by the stance. They weren't. The hind end is substantially higher than the withers. Hind legs quite straight (as frequently goes with that topline, though I haven't seen such an extremely downhill dog before). Down at the pasterns, which is the least concerning of the dog's issues, and it was also out at the elbows, which you can't really see on this photo. Poor dog. :(


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