Humping. "natural" behavior and to be left alone or "rude"?

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xKayleighx
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Humping. "natural" behavior and to be left alone or "rude"?

Postby xKayleighx » Thu Nov 17, 2011 6:16 pm

Okay, so I tried searching for a direct answer and couldn't really find anything.

Can a trainer or someone more well versed in dog body language tell me: if a dog A is humping dog B... should you try to get dog A to quit? Essentially, is humping "okay" dog behavior? Or is it considered "pushy" or "rude?" I would think if it is considered "rude" you would not want a dog to exhibit that behavior.... right?

And say in a "daycare" environment... would you say continual humping from one dog on multiple other dogs... could that cause the other dogs to get riled up and a potential environment for a fight to break out?

This is what I was taught at a kennel I worked at. But I wanted some more advice.

FYI - this is out of mere curiosity... I don't work at a kennel anymore and I don't take my dog to a dog park... :)

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Re: Humping. "natural" behavior and to be left alone or "rud

Postby Curly_07 » Thu Nov 17, 2011 6:21 pm

The first search I did I came up with this recent thread on humping: viewtopic.php?f=6&t=150491&p=1973551&hilit=Humping#p1973551

It pretty much explains why, and how to handle it.

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Re: Humping. "natural" behavior and to be left alone or "rud

Postby xKayleighx » Thu Nov 17, 2011 6:26 pm

Curly_07 wrote:The first search I did I came up with this recent thread on humping: viewtopic.php?f=6&t=150491&p=1973551&hilit=Humping#p1973551

It pretty much explains why, and how to handle it.

Thanks! My search must not have worked or something... this didn't come up for me. :)

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Re: Humping. "natural" behavior and to be left alone or "rud

Postby Curly_07 » Thu Nov 17, 2011 6:46 pm

No problem! I figured that thread could help you better than I could lol


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Re: Humping. "natural" behavior and to be left alone or "rud

Postby Red » Thu Nov 17, 2011 7:02 pm

xKayleighx wrote:And say in a "daycare" environment... would you say continual humping from one dog on multiple other dogs... could that cause the other dogs to get riled up and a potential environment for a fight to break out?


Yes, since humping is more often the results of over stimulation rather than a sexual need. When excitement is involved you do risk a fight, simple because of the higher arousal levels being present.I stop any humping with redirection to other activities, without making a big deal out of it. It isn't really a big deal, and if human beings would stop seeing more than there is to it it would be much better for dogs.Rude or not that is how dogs communicate or deal with stimulation and a little understanding of it would not hurt.

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Re: Humping. "natural" behavior and to be left alone or "rud

Postby Odnarb » Thu Nov 17, 2011 8:14 pm

Letting your dog hump another is like me letting my toddler run wild in a restaurant. Both are very natural behaviors, but perceived as rude by those who have to put up with it. Redirect, or remove dog/child from the situation.

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Re: Humping. "natural" behavior and to be left alone or "rud

Postby BrokenAquarian » Thu Nov 17, 2011 8:27 pm

Many dogs react to being humped, like most people react to being put in a headlock. They get annoyed and a fight can happen. Doesn't matter that the one doing it is only playing or over excited.

My female has been perfectly calm and wanting to take a nap. She tried to crawl over my other dog and happened to be in the general position while passing over him - she stopped and started thrusting. No over excitement there. I know it wasn't sexual, but it seems to be instinctive to a certian point. lol

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Re: Humping. "natural" behavior and to be left alone or "rud

Postby xKayleighx » Thu Nov 17, 2011 10:20 pm

I really appreciate all the answers!

I know with Bruce, he is very non reactive to most "rude" behavior but as soon as a dog tries to hump him he will turn right around and tell him to BACK OFF :po: Because of this and other things I noticed, my initial thought was that it is not construed as the best behavior. And now I know. :)

When I was working at the kennel I would never allow the dogs to hump. Most of the time a simple redirection of attention worked, but there were a few (mostly labs now that I think about it) who were constant humpers, that would not stop.

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Re: Humping. "natural" behavior and to be left alone or "rud

Postby MarMar » Fri Nov 18, 2011 12:54 am

I "fostered" a little stray Yorkie once (who was eventually returned to his home safe and sound). He was intact and VERY excitable. I thought it was really neat to see how my GSD mix Becky very effectively "trained" him not to hump in about five minutes. She went from a freeze, to a growl, to a snap, to a bark and a pin with her paw very methodically. He never tried to hump her again. Unfortunately this doesn't work in all situations with all dogs for a huge variety of reasons, so I also advocate for the interrupt and redirect/calm. My APBT mix gets humped by my roommates's pug and he would be the type of dog to be stressed by it for a bit and then lose it and act inappropriately, so we intervene. Kevin learned very quickly however not to hump Becky ;)

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Re: Humping. "natural" behavior and to be left alone or "rud

Postby Sarah » Fri Nov 18, 2011 11:59 am

Depends on the dogs involved, and the exact situation. In a daycare situation, I absolutely would not allow it. My Tully has always been inclined to get humpy with my other dogs, and the other dogs clearly don't care, so I ignore it. Pirate is at an age where he wants to get humpy with new dogs that he meets, so I redirect, or don't let him meet new dogs, because their reaction to the behavior is unknown.

I do like to let my dogs interact and communicate naturally, but I watch to be sure that they are on the same page, if one is showing signs of irritation, I step in. I do not wait for anything like bared teeth or snapping, I break up the interaction well before that would occur.

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Re: Humping. "natural" behavior and to be left alone or "rud

Postby Kitty Kitty » Sat Nov 19, 2011 8:12 pm

He will stop when he is finished! :shakeit:

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Re: Humping. "natural" behavior and to be left alone or "rud

Postby AllisonPitbullLvr » Sat Nov 19, 2011 9:06 pm

I don't allow humping. But I must say, I don't know if it's because she's Old and lame or because she's only giving a half hearted effort, but watching Buddy air hump a dog standing beside her is funny. I don't care who you are!


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