Dominating, non-affectionate puppy?

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Eita
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Dominating, non-affectionate puppy?

Postby Eita » Wed Oct 03, 2012 5:20 pm

Hi,
yesterday something special happened. All of a sudden we had a pit pup in the house. He is 7 weeks old and comes from a short stay in a home with children with astma (why they got him in the first place, don´t ask me).

Our impression after less than 24 hours: extremely bold and outgoing, curious, active, secure, cheerful, has good appetite, gets well along with EA - our soon 4-year-old pit-girl - and the cats. He is social. So far so good.

But: he snarls and growls if we correct him, bites in his baby-way, he doesn´t like to be petted - also snarls - and doesn´t give affection in a way I have experienced most puppies do, with kisses etc. Also, he doesn´t like to lie tummy up in our laps . We put him there if he gets overexcited or starts to growl and snarl, until he calms down.

Do we have a very dominating pup? Why isn´t he affectionate? Aren´t most pits very affectionate?

Give me some hints please!!!!

Eita´s mum

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AllisonPitbullLvr
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Re: Dominating, non-affectionate puppy?

Postby AllisonPitbullLvr » Wed Oct 03, 2012 6:35 pm

He's not being "dominant" which is a term that needs to crawl in a hole and die. First off, you've said yourself you have no idea of his breeding or background and he's already been in a home at only 7 weeks. He should still be with his litter.

I know you have limited access to trainers but throw away any notion of dominance/submission, and start looking into positive reinforcement based training. A good place to start is to head to YouTube and search "kikopup".

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Eita
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Re: Dominating, non-affectionate puppy?

Postby Eita » Wed Oct 03, 2012 6:44 pm

Hi,
I will look into that, thanks. No, I know next to nothing about his background. The only thing I was told was that the mother started killing the pups (=stressed??) and that was the reason why the pups were sold early.

Oh yes, totally agree, should be with his litter! But EA is a subsitute; he adores her and she treats him very well.

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suzanne
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Re: Dominating, non-affectionate puppy?

Postby suzanne » Wed Oct 03, 2012 10:29 pm

Eita wrote:The only thing I was told was that the mother started killing the pups (=stressed??) and that was the reason why the pups were sold early.


Stop right there, you should have walked away when you heard that.

Mom killing pups should have been a big red flag on temperament, just IMO.

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Re: Dominating, non-affectionate puppy?

Postby AllisonPitbullLvr » Thu Oct 04, 2012 4:51 am

suzanne wrote:
Eita wrote:The only thing I was told was that the mother started killing the pups (=stressed??) and that was the reason why the pups were sold early.


Stop right there, you should have walked away when you heard that.

Mom killing pups should have been a big red flag on temperament, just IMO.


Yep. And EA is not a substitute, regardless of how good she is with him.

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Eita
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Re: Dominating, non-affectionate puppy?

Postby Eita » Thu Oct 04, 2012 11:44 am

Hi,
I have heard of many mothers killing their pups, but I thought it was stress??

Our pup is doing fine. He is social, friendly, curious and lively. But he doesn´t like affection too much and often starts snarling and growling. We alwways take him up on the lap tummy up, until he calms down. He has started giving kisses, though. Any comments on that?

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Re: Dominating, non-affectionate puppy?

Postby starrlamia » Thu Oct 04, 2012 11:54 am

Eita wrote:Hi,
I have heard of many mothers killing their pups, but I thought it was stress??

Our pup is doing fine. He is social, friendly, curious and lively. But he doesn´t like affection too much and often starts snarling and growling. We alwways take him up on the lap tummy up, until he calms down. He has started giving kisses, though. Any comments on that?

i would recommend not putting him tummy up, it is very stressful and will just make the situation worse. You have had the pup for a short amount of time, and he has been bounced around, give him time to settle in. Some pups are a little bossy, since he was taken away from his litter mates and mom early he most likely hasnt learned to play nicely nor handle frustration well. I would get him into a puppy class and work on his socialization.

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Eita
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Re: Dominating, non-affectionate puppy?

Postby Eita » Thu Oct 04, 2012 12:39 pm

Hi, yes tummy up might be stressful, but we insist on calming him down, holding him firmly. I wish there were puppy classes in the country where we live - it´s even hard to find normally socialized and sane dogs here, in general!!! And we would so much want to socialize him, both with other animals and people.

We had problems socializaing EA with other dogs, for the same reason, and she does still not behave well on the street, although she is improving. She has gradually learnt to be good with dogs of people we know, and visitng homes with dogs is no longer a problem, but we would like Egon to behave well with everyone - and we hope that EA won´t set bad examples on the street!

Thanks for listening to me! We so much wish that Egon will turn out nice and all comments and recommendations are welcome!!!!!I study a lot, but there is so much to learn. And I have very little experience with small pups - more with bigger dogs.

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AllisonPitbullLvr
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Re: Dominating, non-affectionate puppy?

Postby AllisonPitbullLvr » Thu Oct 04, 2012 12:56 pm

There are ways to teach a puppy to be calm without "alpha rolling" him. Have you checked out any of the kikopup videos?

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Re: Dominating, non-affectionate puppy?

Postby HappyPuppy » Thu Oct 04, 2012 4:38 pm

My dog didn't expose her belly for YEARS ... now, she goes belly up for scratches but that took 4 or 5 years for her to get there and she was one that was great 'out of the box' from the shelter....

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Eita
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Re: Dominating, non-affectionate puppy?

Postby Eita » Thu Oct 04, 2012 9:24 pm

Oh, nothing nicer than a round, warm belly which wants to be scratched!! EA has had her tummy up since she was a baby:).

But Egon is different. He seems friendly and social enough, but detests physical contact. , He hates being on the lap, especially tummy up. Almost any physical contact and he starts to grow and snarl and bite. If you get too close with your face to his, he will bite you. He is only 7,5 weeks old!!! Is there something really wrong with him? Can this behaviour be repaired? If he continues this way, we can´t have him close to children.

In other senses he does seem good. He is lively, curious, cheerful - and does seem affectionate as well. He will lick arms, legs - but not your face, he already knows us well and is happy to see us even after a short separation. But I have never seen a puppy like this!!!

Haven´t seen the videos on You Tube. The connection has been lousy lately.

SO grateful for comments!!!!

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Re: Dominating, non-affectionate puppy?

Postby HappyPuppy » Thu Oct 04, 2012 9:51 pm

To me (with no experience with puppies) it sounds like bite inhibition - if you already have him at less than 8 weeks its possible that he missed some socialization and mama-taught inhibitions.... give him time and patience and repetition/consistency and I bet you guys will end up OK. I forgot how young he was. FWIW I have NO interest in having such a young puppy - I doubt either of us would survive that experience!! :)

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AllisonPitbullLvr
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Re: Dominating, non-affectionate puppy?

Postby AllisonPitbullLvr » Thu Oct 04, 2012 10:03 pm

If he doesn't like physical contact now, why on earth would using aversive methods make him feel any different? You need to teach him that physical touch = good things happen.

Start by touching him gently and in a way to which he doesn't respond negatively. Then reward him with a treat. Slowly work your way up to being able to handle him more and more but be careful that you maintain a connection between touch and reward. Don't push him and good lord, don't use any physical punishments or "corrections". He needs to associate human hands with food.

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Re: Dominating, non-affectionate puppy?

Postby Ilovethepits » Fri Oct 05, 2012 2:49 pm

I am begging you to take Allison's advice with your new, young puppy.

I did everything WRONG in the same situation and my dog is 12 now...he still has fear issues and does not like being handled AT ALL! PLEASE TAKE ALLISON'S ADVICE.

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Re: Dominating, non-affectionate puppy?

Postby Amie » Fri Oct 05, 2012 3:13 pm

This
Eita wrote:He is social, friendly, curious and lively.
does not equal this
Eita wrote:But he doesn´t like affection too much and often starts snarling and growling.

and this
Eita wrote:He seems friendly and social enough,
does not equal this
Eita wrote:but detests physical contact.
or this
Eita wrote:Almost any physical contact and he starts to grow and snarl and bite.


He is NOT social and I'm afraid if you don't take Alison's advice he's only going to get worse.


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