A Variety of Leash Training Methods

Tricks, obedience, behavior, and more.
gotti_blu
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good results

Postby gotti_blu » Sun Jan 06, 2008 1:17 pm

struggling with the leash for some time. Walked my boy to petco and bought the prong collar. i started working him right out of the door and he started to understand not to walk ahead of me. Than he would put up a fight about 10 min after i started using the collar. He only tired him self out. by the time we got back to the neighborhood he was walking next to me. every once in a while i would have to give correction. I highy encourage this method for pullers like the bully breeds.

To top it off i am wearing a walking boot due to a motorcycle crash. not a good combo with a puller and a day of rain on the ground

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hailey919
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Postby hailey919 » Thu Feb 21, 2008 12:15 pm

I just got a apbt over a month ago. Her name is Hailey..and it really sucks to walk her, because she pulls until she is completely choking and doesnt care....do i really have to use a prong collar?? or is a harness ok..because I really dont want to put a chain collar on her...but I cannot deal with her thickheadedness...but I tried the turning around thing and it doesnt really seem to get threw her head....I bought her when she was 16 weeks old..and she had never been on a leash before that...

HELPP :frown: :frown:

reddog
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Postby reddog » Thu Mar 20, 2008 9:34 pm

hailey919 wrote:I just got a apbt over a month ago. Her name is Hailey..and it really sucks to walk her, because she pulls until she is completely choking and doesnt care....do i really have to use a prong collar?? or is a harness ok..because I really dont want to put a chain collar on her...but I cannot deal with her thickheadedness...but I tried the turning around thing and it doesnt really seem to get threw her head....I bought her when she was 16 weeks old..and she had never been on a leash before that...

HELPP :frown: :frown:


what is a prong collor? is that the one pet stores use to train with? the one with spikes that goes into the dogs neck when it pulls?

I heard this method works good for a dog that pulls all the time but was unsessful with a frds dog, but again i had a regular collar on him. and I didnt know you was supposed to walk 10 feet or more, the person who told me just said walk about 6 steps.

I am going to try with a reg collar, maybe it work some.

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Chaosdog05
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Postby Chaosdog05 » Mon Mar 24, 2008 7:48 am

I used to use a prong collar on Chaos it didn't slow him down at all. He pulled just as hard and the worse thing about it was that from what I hear those prong collars can puncture his throat. The collar doesn't make a dog walk better it's the way you walk him/her.

drzoid
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Postby drzoid » Sun May 25, 2008 9:47 pm

My boy is doing the total opposite...he doesn't want to go at all. Any suggestions? He needs his exercise!

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whiskeypup
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Postby whiskeypup » Fri Aug 15, 2008 8:01 am

Worked very very well for me yesterday, i have struggled trying to do this with a regular collar, but about halfway through our walk yesterday he was already doing waaaaay better than he ever has before.

Thanks for the lesson! :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

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Lua
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Re: re

Postby Lua » Sat Aug 23, 2008 7:10 pm

Diane Jessup wrote:No. Dangling food is considered "luring", and not something you want to do in positive training.

TO be honest, explaining the beginings/basics of teaching the heel are explained in detail many places, on the web, in Fully Bully Magazine, and in any good obedience magazine (like Front and Finish.) I will explain in VERY basic terms here, but please understand that this is a very ROUGH sketch.

Remember, you are training the dog with your brain, not your strong arm. So, you gotta think. First thing you think: how do I set it up so my dog won't be distracted? Won't wander off? Will WANT to do the correct behavior so I can reward it?
OK. Because, remember, this is not about SETTING UP YOUR DOG TO FAIL, such as turning suddenly without warning so the dog HAS to fail and yelp and get punished for doing what??? For not understanding. Punishment training sets the dog up to fail so you can correct - positive shows the dog what you want, and then you condition the dog that doing right is more rewarding than doing wrong!

So, you've figured out the first part. You take the dog somewhere quiet and safe, a backyard, a tennis court, etc. You will have had to do your homework and understand what motivates your dog. Not just show up with a few crummy hot dog pieces and think that will cut it. To get the deal on motivation, see Issue I/II/III/IV of Fully Bully Magazine. I have explained it in detail there. Part of it is also on www.workingpitbull.com under training.

Now, if you have done YOUR PART as the teacher, you KNOW what motivates your dog and you have it with you. If it is food, call the dog to you, give it several pieces while the dog looks at you. Let the dog know you have the food. Again, if you have been lazy and your dog is so-so about food, you are not ready to train. If the dog is toy-happy, play with the toy for a few moments, so she knows you have it.

While the dog is interested in you, start walking. Dont call dog, don't look back. Just walk. If the dog wanders off, fine, let it. This is where patience comes in! The dog has no idea what is wanted right now. That's OK! Relax! :))

WHEN the dog happens to cross your path, or get into position, you "mark" the behavior with a marker (some people click, some like myself say "YES!") and then you either feed or throw the toy. (Food is better here because it is less distracting, but a toy works.) You can see where you have to have done your homework and understand what motivates your dog, or otherwise the dog will just loose interest in you. THat is YOUR PROBLEM, not he dogs!!!! BAD teacher - not bad dog!

So everytime the dog comes into the heel position you mark the behavior and then reinforce with the food. The food comes AFTER the "mark". The dog will, if this is done right, come to understand the mark is what is important. In fact, their eyes will dilate when they hear the word!

So you do this several times, in a place where dog can't wander off. In this place, you add distractions. I have described elsewhere how you can QUICKLY get your dog to ignore someone blatantly offering the dog food or a toy. This can be done in one session. Its simply a matter of teaching the dog that by running off, they don't get the satisfaction of the distraction and they are "burning daylight" with you and your rewards. If you ever get a chance to see a good trainer do this, it is really trick! :headbang:

Obviously you take small steps so that the dog learns WHAT IS RIGHT - not WHAT IS WRONG! You add all kinds of small distractions, work the dog through them, and then add bigger ones. Then put the leash on and go forth into the world. But hey, remember, you are USING YOUR BRAIN so don't dump huge distractions on the dog all at once. If your dog has a dog aggression problem, fine, work on it in the beginning, not once you sally forth. Common sense.

Anywho, my fingers are sore!!! :thumbsup: If you have trouble finding good info on positive training let me know. I can help you. There are links on my site.


Excellent post!

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Bennysmom
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Postby Bennysmom » Sun Aug 24, 2008 6:10 am

I'll second that!! Thanks for all the great tips and info, :thumbsup:

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Borbality
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working already

Postby Borbality » Tue Oct 28, 2008 12:45 pm

My new guy has overall been good on walks so far. He doesn't pull hard and doesn't bark or jump or go nuts or anything like that, but he is going too far ahead so the leash is tight a lot of the time. I want him to stay closer, especially when we're not jogging, which isn't a problem because he doesn't run very fast on a jog.

I don't like having my arm outstretched while walking and I don't want to have to keep pulling him back without results.

So yesterday I started the STOP technique Ms. Jessup explained and he seems to be catching on quickly. When I slow down or stop, he is realizing that if he doesn't slow down he's not going very far.

Also, it seems like whenever I say his name he slows down, but when i say GOOD BOY he seems to get excited and speed up. He's been very good and sits and stays while on walks no problem, so I think it'll only take a few weeks to make him a great walker!

Very good method though. I was using a small chain and tugging on him dog whisperer-style (i know, i know) when he was getting distracted or getting ahead, but I could see that wasn't really correcting anything besides the current motion.

While I'm sure it works for some, Napoleon didn't seem to be LEARNING anything besides "just keep going and hope you don't get tugged!" lol

So now I have the leash almost completely loose and just TALK to him and tell him what I want. He seems to be picking it up real fast. I didn't use a chain today and didn't come close to needing one. He even met a friendly neighborhood dog on a leash!

I might keep his chain on him but only as a precaution to something crazy happening, like if a neighborhood dog isn't so friendly after all. I wouldn't want him to break off his regular collar. NO TUGGING THE DOG!

He still stops and gets excited for dogs and cats and people, but he's getting the hang of it already so I can only keep it up and hope for further improvement!

Very glad I read this post. It all seems so obvious after someone puts it into the right perspective. And like I said, I'm sure the tug-correct method works for a lot of people but I could see it wasn't really getting through to my guy and it wasn't the results I would like.

sydking
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Postby sydking » Thu Jan 29, 2009 11:24 pm

drzoid wrote:My boy is doing the total opposite...he doesn't want to go at all. Any suggestions? He needs his exercise!


my girl is the same, she is 10 weeks now and at first she did walk with me but dragged behind a bit, now all she wants to do is sniff around the grass and eat leaves and wont walk, any suggestions?

blip
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Postby blip » Wed Feb 11, 2009 9:09 am

Mine stops occassionally when we walk. I began using treats to get her to keep walking. Sometimes they shut down bc they are tired but I knew mine was just complaining. I brought treats and made it fun and now she is much better.

blip
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Postby blip » Wed Feb 11, 2009 9:11 am

Also, when we go out, I let her pee/poop first.

When she is done, we go onto the street, so that there are less scent distractions.

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Po.Verse
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Postby Po.Verse » Wed Feb 11, 2009 9:51 am

sydking wrote:
drzoid wrote:My boy is doing the total opposite...he doesn't want to go at all. Any suggestions? He needs his exercise!


my girl is the same, she is 10 weeks now and at first she did walk with me but dragged behind a bit, now all she wants to do is sniff around the grass and eat leaves and wont walk, any suggestions?


Those scents are new to her. Try treats, and when shes at your side, treat

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Rangersmom
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Positive Reinforcement Training

Postby Rangersmom » Wed Jun 17, 2009 6:11 pm

Positive Reinforcement Training is the absolute best thing you can do for yourselves and your dogs.

Ms. Jessup gives great advice on teaching dogs to leash walk, and to focus, and all of us would be doing our dogs a huge favor by following what she has to say. I've been doing this training with my year old and 3 year old dog through a trainer near me. The 3 year old is working toward becoming an agility dog and it amazes me every week when we go there what a huge difference this training has made. My dogs focus on me and are waiting to see what I want them to do next.

Teach them to come to their names, you can make opening a door a much easier process if you teach them to sit and "wait" or "stay". All of these things can be taught with positive reinforcement. I HAVE to do it this way or with 4 dogs all trying to get out all at once I'd go nuts!

As far as a very young puppy is concerned, lagging back is a good opportunity to use the "name game" (without using the word come, save that for when you KNOW the puppy will come.) Use a short leash 3'. Say his/her name in strong voice and backup. When he turns, say "Yes", back up and reward. Be exciting! Practice the name game as often as possible, add distractions in when the puppy is consistantly coming to his name. This will work for a walk also.

Rangersmom

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TheIcon
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Re: A Variety of Leash Training Methods

Postby TheIcon » Mon Jan 25, 2010 10:57 am

I must say I am jealous of quite a few of you. Put the prong collar on and magic happens. My 1.5 yr old dog seems to be imune to the magic :) When using a regular collar she would pull and stop to sniff and do all that but we would walk quite a long way away from the house. Now i tried the prong collar and she walked perfect the first 2 days however she wouldn't leave the long driveway in front of my house. We would get ready to go down the street and she would freeze.

Now when we go out she barely walks at all and sits down and won't move in any direction except the front door to go back in. It is def frustrating because I want to go on walks with her but walking 10 steps and freezing isn't fun for either of us. Makes me want to go back to the old way and just let her pull me. Atleast we walk and burn some energy. However I know this isn't the way it should be.

So so far I am trying to remain consistent and try and walk her back and forth on teh driveway as much as possible and as much as she will do. Hoping she gets more confident and we can eventually walk further away. Does this sound proper or should I be doing something else.


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