Muzzles

Tricks, obedience, behavior, and more.

Have you considered acclimating your dog(s) to a muzzle?

Yes
43
60%
No
29
40%
 
Total votes: 72

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concreterose
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Muzzles

Postby concreterose » Fri Sep 28, 2007 10:30 am

I have read quite a few posts on here where people are vehemently opposed to working with dogs that may have issues with humans or other dogs with muzzles. I have to say, this is pretty strange to me, as it is safer for the handler, other people and the dogs is the dog has been introduced correctly to weaking a muzzle.

I have also seen firsthand people working with dogs wearing muzzles, and the dogs did not appear to be stressed out at all.

Why are some people so opposed to muzzling a dog to work with it if necessary and the muzzle is introduced to the dog properly?

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Maryellen
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Postby Maryellen » Fri Sep 28, 2007 10:43 am

all mine can wear muzzles if needed.. ( i used tohave to muzzle jesse at the vets)
i dont see anything wrong with a dog being muzzled for certain purposes, but i would rather a trainer/behaviorist see in person the dog before suggesting putting a muzzle on a dog.. and yes, some times the muzzle can help, but there are some dogs who get VERY defensive with a muzzle on.. its a touchy subject, and can go either way.. i think if the dog is acclimated the proper way to a muzzle its fine for training/behavior problems to be worked on.

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Postby Kahlie » Fri Sep 28, 2007 10:55 am

My vote is more of a theoretical, as I have to muzzle my brats by law anyways.
That said, depending on circumstances with any dog, I would have introduced them to tolerating them.

I think much of the negative notions regarding muzzles are instantly that a dog wearing one, is dangerous and will bite. As opposed to looking at it as a precautionary measure for the possibility that, as a dog, a dog might bite depending on the situation. It's like a muzzle automatically translates to 'I have a loaded gun, watch out'.

I'll again use Hungary as an example, there dogs are allowed on public transpo so long as the guarding breeds are muzzled. Does the public make comments, is there an outcry? No. It's just..the way things are. You don't get looks of utter disgust.
Here you seem to.

That said, I still would gladly get my dogs accustomed to muzzles so that if ever they were in a situation to need it (or it would be best to have it on), they'd not feel intimidated.

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concreterose
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Postby concreterose » Fri Sep 28, 2007 11:15 am

Callie wrote:My vote is more of a theoretical, as I have to muzzle my brats by law anyways.
That said, depending on circumstances with any dog, I would have introduced them to tolerating them.

I think much of the negative notions regarding muzzles are instantly that a dog wearing one, is dangerous and will bite. As opposed to looking at it as a precautionary measure for the possibility that, as a dog, a dog might bite depending on the situation. It's like a muzzle automatically translates to 'I have a loaded gun, watch out'.

I'll again use Hungary as an example, there dogs are allowed on public transpo so long as the guarding breeds are muzzled. Does the public make comments, is there an outcry? No. It's just..the way things are. You don't get looks of utter disgust.
Here you seem to.

That said, I still would gladly get my dogs accustomed to muzzles so that if ever they were in a situation to need it (or it would be best to have it on), they'd not feel intimidated.


Great post! I think that is much the way that people think in the US as well.
Also, I do not believe that it takes a rocket scientist to teach a dog to accept a muzzle, the average dog owner can make it a positive experience for the dog if they do the research to introduce it correctly.

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Postby msvette2u » Fri Sep 28, 2007 12:38 pm

I think of a muzzle as a training tool as well as a safety tool. Just like any training tool or device, it must be used properly. And since you gotta use it properly, it stands to reason it could be used improperly too.
I don't advocate people rushing out, when they have a biter, or a bite risk, and buying a muzzle so it won't bite.
That's like putting a band-aid on a bleeding artery.
Find out WHY the dog is biting first, and then work with that, in conjuction, possibly, with the muzzle.
A muzzle doesn't solve issues. Training the dog with the proper techniques does, whether or not that involves a muzzle.

**Just FYI, we had a terribly dominant dog who bit each of the members of our family more than once, including my then 5yr. old daughter and my 8yr. old son AND my teenage girl.
We understood the problem - dominance - and tried to work with it, crated the dog when necessary, NILIF etc. but nothing was working.
Since he WAS a danger, we purchased a muzzle. All that did was teach him that while the muzzle was on he had to behave. When the muzzle was off, he was the same dominant dog and after he bit my son again, for walking BY him on the floor, we euthanized him (after three months of tring to train him and getting bitten each time - btw, he came from a drug raid and had been exposed to Meth production so maybe it wasn't a good idea in the first place to have gotten him but that's a whole 'nother issue)
Now, granted, I'm not an expert in training and in fact there's very few good trainers in this area, unless you count PetsMart!!?? But still, all I'm saying is that you need to get to the root of the problem and not just slap a muzzle on and call it good.
I think if the dog is that dangerous to the household, other arrangements need to be made, such as training with a professional, and a muzzle isn't going to solve anything.
With a trainer on board, who is a good trainer and not just some flake, you could use a muzzle to be safer WHILE stressing the dog, but to just get a muzzle and think that will solve the issue is quite possibly foolhardy IMO.

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Postby Sarah » Fri Sep 28, 2007 12:47 pm

The only reason I could have for muzzling one of my dogs would be if it were legally required, and if that were the case, I'd deal with it then. None of the dogs I own have issues that would require wearing a muzzle, so I have no reason to introduce one. (and I wouldn't keep a bull breed dog that I thought would bite a human, so I would never need one for that reason.)

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Postby rednoseErnie » Fri Sep 28, 2007 1:04 pm

I have thought about it. And I should really do it. For me, the reasoning would be to acclimatize him now, in case he ever needs to wear one later.

Earlier this year, Ernie bit another dog while being handled by my dog sitter. Now, because of his high dog aggression, I normally do not allow anyone but my boyfriend or I to handle him in public, but he had a veterinary emergency while I was away. The sitter allowed another dog to jump on him, and wham. Anyway, I have thought that in the future, should a similar problem arise while he was in someone elses care, I would have the sitter muzzle him before taking him out.

Also, I have considered in for some interactions with children, because unfortunately Ernie was never really socialized with children and it worries me. But I have not done this yet either.

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Postby merriterrier » Fri Sep 28, 2007 1:09 pm

All my dogs are acclimated to a muzzle. Mostly because they may at some point need to wear a muzzle. There are many reasons a dog may have to wear a muzzle that have nothing to do with the dog being a danger to someone. At the vet we went to a couple times (before deciding he sucked) they muzzled every dog when it walked in the door. And at our E vet they muzzle all dogs for x-rays etc so I got my dogs used to it so they wouldn't be shocked. If I need to transport my Pit Bull through Denver they will ask that I muzzle him when I obtain a permit. Ardy wears a muzzle (basket type) b/c he eats dirt; not just a little, he can eat a hole full of dirt in one sitting and it makes him very sick, and he will do it all day. It is like OCD. So when he is outside he wears his muzzle. (We have worked with him for 2 years to not eat dirt, we have been to the vet and done blood tests etc up the wazoo.)

msvette2u

Postby msvette2u » Fri Sep 28, 2007 1:16 pm

Oh yeah well for those reasons, I can see. I've muzzled both my poo-eaters so they can't get into the poo out there. ;)

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Postby ZiggysMom » Fri Sep 28, 2007 1:17 pm

I think that any dog either with dog aggression or fear issues around people, even if it's just at the vets, should consider learning to wear a muzzle. Not that they'd wear it all the time by any means, but you never know when you might have to leave your dog with someone who doesn't know them as well if you have a family emergency or something. It would be hugely helpful if you own a muzzle that fits well and is comfortable and the dog has worn it before so they're not afraid of it, should you need it in an emergency.

The LAST thing you want would be to come upon a situation where your dog might need a muzzle, and have to go out and buy a cruddy one at the last minute and stick it on your dog when they've never seen it before and it will only add to their fear.

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Postby *leenie* » Fri Sep 28, 2007 2:47 pm

Emma needs a muzzle, we dont have one, so she isnt allowed in public until she is well acclimated to one. She is a VERY DA lab. She also has fear issues and will bite when in fear. She never bit a family member but bit a groomer when the groomer refused to muzzle her. So As soon as i do my research on the different kinds and can talk my parents into letting Emma get one, she will get one. I bet she misses the beach and petsmart.

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Postby KadillacGrrl » Fri Sep 28, 2007 2:51 pm

Two of my dogs have had to wear a muzzle at the vet's for a short time... Neither one of them really liked it but my dogs pretty much know that they have to do whatever I ask of them so it wasn't too big of a deal.

I don't feel it's necessary to muzzle train my dogs, but of course if something changed legally I would.

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Postby Jazzy » Fri Sep 28, 2007 3:11 pm

I've never thought about it as I have no reason to muzzle my dog. If it were required by law, or a reason developed...then we would deal with it and muzzled she would be.

(Although it would suck if she reacted the same way as when I put the Halloween princess hat with accompanying blond wig on her head...)

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Sarah
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Postby Sarah » Fri Sep 28, 2007 3:30 pm

merriterrier wrote:. At the vet we went to a couple times (before deciding he sucked) they muzzled every dog when it walked in the door.


I haven't used, and would not use, a vet that required muzzling. It is completely unnecessary. I worked at one busy vet practice for 5 years, and we very rarely needed to muzzle any dog to handle it. And you can tell if you're going to need to muzzle a dog. If they have that little faith in their dog skills, I don't want them handling my dogs.

Elmo & Tully have both been at the vet in severe pain situations, and handled extensively by the vet staff, without showing the slightest consideration of biting anyone. Nobody has ever suggested muzzling them in those situations, and my current vet allows owners of emergency cases to come back into the treatment area, where you can see everything that's done to your dog (actually, they've never even asked me, they just lead us straight back there)

For eating inappropriate stuff, a muzzle makes sense, but it's not a problem I have with my current dogs, so no need to acclimate them to a muzzle for that. Ditto on the dog aggression issues.

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Postby CinderDee » Fri Sep 28, 2007 3:47 pm

My dog is acclimated to a muzzle and has his own. He doesn't think it's a big deal at all.


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