Question for all of you rescuers out there (long)

Why buy from a breeder when there are plenty of homeless pups in shelters???
User avatar
chinsNdobermans
Bully Lover 4 Life
Posts: 1438
Joined: Mon Dec 17, 2007 12:22 pm
Location: WNY
Contact:

Question for all of you rescuers out there (long)

Postby chinsNdobermans » Sat Jan 12, 2008 9:09 am

So as I have been browsing some rescue organizations' websites, I have noticed that a lot of them require adopters' ages to be 21+. I understand that they feel that people over this age are more financially secure and have more stability in their lives.

Now my fiancé and I would like to adopt from a rescue group after we get out house and get settled in and see how things are going. It will be us, and my little dog and the chinchillas (who have their own room and would never be in contact with the dogs). I feel more secure with a big dog in the house (even if they are friendly, a big dog is a crime deterrent in and of itself) and would love to help a pittie (or other breed) that is in need.

He and I are 20. He will be 21 in November. However, I consider us more settled than a lot of 21+ year olds. The house we are moving into is owned by his grandmother (no chance of eviction of pet-policies changing), and will be where we will be living for the foreseeable future. We are getting married in less than a year, and both have steady jobs. He works almost full-time while in college at a job he's been at for 3 years and will be graduating in a couple of semesters with a computer science degree. I have a decent-paying job in my career field already (journalism rarely pays great), and will likely be moving up with that company upon completion of my degree. I work from home and am only gone in the spans of time I have classes (generally 3-4 hours). The chinchilla business and odd jobs that we both do bring in additional money.

Of course we want to find a dog who fits our household. It needs to be a male, who can deal with my female beagle mix who just wants to be left alone. An older dog who is a little more laid-back would be ideal. We will wait as long as it takes to find a dog who fits into that niche.

The house we're moving into has a fenced yard and an empty lot on one side, in a neighborhood mostly composed of older people on a one-way side street. The town has no "dangerous" dog laws that bar by breed (the local area is very pit-friendly).

We do plan to make one move in the very distant future if I decide to apply to law school, but I am going to wait and see where this company takes me. I may decide that I am happy without a law degree.

Now I know that the 21+ rule is there for a reason. But would there be a possibility for consideration just prior to that age? I haven't noticed it with every rescue group, mind you. I have a lot of bully breed experience, although I've never owned one myself (I was never allowed) and would prefer to go through a rescue that allows for a foster assessment.

I'm not saying that we're sure we'll be ready to adopt prior to the 21 mark but if we are, will this be a setback?

msvette2u

Postby msvette2u » Sat Jan 12, 2008 12:07 pm

I'd adopt a dog to you :dunno:

User avatar
chinsNdobermans
Bully Lover 4 Life
Posts: 1438
Joined: Mon Dec 17, 2007 12:22 pm
Location: WNY
Contact:

Postby chinsNdobermans » Sat Jan 12, 2008 2:11 pm

Well hey, that's encouraging! :thumbsup:

User avatar
violet
Addicted to PBF
Posts: 6874
Joined: Fri Mar 05, 2004 11:40 pm
Location: Tacoma,WA
Contact:

Postby violet » Sat Jan 12, 2008 2:21 pm

I ask for people to be 25+ BUT..age is not an automatic disqualifier. It's a guideline. I am currently working on an adoption to a 21 yr old because in every other respect, he has so far shown himself to be a great potential adopter :)

User avatar
Allie
Addicted to PBF
Posts: 10814
Joined: Wed Mar 09, 2005 8:09 am
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Contact:

Postby Allie » Sat Jan 12, 2008 4:17 pm

I believe I was 22 when we adopted. I'm not sure if the rescue I worked with has an age policy or not, but due to the fact that I have proven to be a stable, responsible dog owner and homeowner (I bought my home at 19), the rescue was willing to work with me regardless of age.
It seems that rescues with policies like that can generally make exceptions and work with the adopters for the *right* home.

User avatar
chinsNdobermans
Bully Lover 4 Life
Posts: 1438
Joined: Mon Dec 17, 2007 12:22 pm
Location: WNY
Contact:

Postby chinsNdobermans » Sat Jan 12, 2008 4:22 pm

We won't own our home however - it is one of multiple properties his grandmother owns. However, if we like it she's willing to sell it to us, or maybe even give...lol that's wishful thinking. So it's kind of a rent-to-own situation.

Is that better than just regular renting, in the eyes of a rescue?

User avatar
pittymomma
Bully Ambassador
Posts: 2188
Joined: Tue Oct 26, 2004 7:02 pm
Location: www.bulliesinneed.ca
Contact:

Postby pittymomma » Sat Jan 12, 2008 5:31 pm

Our application states " 21 and over" but that doesn't mean we won't consider someone who is younger.

As long as the applicant is mature, responsible and ready for adoption then their age is not that important.

We have it state 21 and over so we don't get 16 year olds applying lol

User avatar
Victoria
Matured Bully
Posts: 413
Joined: Mon Apr 09, 2007 10:59 am
Location: Washington

Postby Victoria » Sat Jan 12, 2008 7:52 pm

We also have the 21 an over policy, but it is a guideline not a strict rule. To my knowledge, we have not adopted to anyone under 21 yet, but if the right people came along for the right dog, it would not disqualify them. It is best if you find a dog you are very interested in, that you write the rescue, tell them of all the positives to you as a dog owner, and be up front with them about your age right from the start. I'm sure you will find many will be willing to work with you!

User avatar
Victoria
Matured Bully
Posts: 413
Joined: Mon Apr 09, 2007 10:59 am
Location: Washington

Postby Victoria » Sat Jan 12, 2008 7:57 pm

Ok, I'm dying of curiosity now. What is your chinchilla business?

User avatar
chinsNdobermans
Bully Lover 4 Life
Posts: 1438
Joined: Mon Dec 17, 2007 12:22 pm
Location: WNY
Contact:

Postby chinsNdobermans » Sat Jan 12, 2008 8:20 pm

PM'd you with details about the chinchillas ;)

User avatar
JCleve86
Forum Junky
Posts: 3129
Joined: Mon Jul 12, 2004 11:38 pm
Location: Puyallup, WA
Contact:

Postby JCleve86 » Sat Jan 12, 2008 8:21 pm

Yeah...what everyone else said...as a general rule most rescues will break "the rules" for the right person. It's all how you present yourself really. I was looking to adopt beginning about a year ago (was 20 at the time)...and I'm a renter, college student, work part time...pretty much on paper the worst potential adopter a rescue could come up with. lol But in my search I made it clear to the rescues that I did contact that I believe pets are for life, that I understood the breed, had found a rental that would allow this breed, etc. etc. etc. and didn't have anyone turn me down. And now I have my little monster. :))

User avatar
merriterrier
Addicted to PBF
Posts: 6072
Joined: Sun May 13, 2007 11:57 am
Location: somewhere in the hills...
Contact:

Postby merriterrier » Sat Jan 12, 2008 10:00 pm

I second what others said. A really good adopter should no be denied b/c of their age, but I think that sort of wording helps to discourage potential adopters in that age group who might not be very responsible.
I had a very hard time adopting Chloe b/c of my age (at the time), but struggled through and got her. Basically what JCleve86 said. I would consider you as a good potential adopter based on your description. Good Luck!

User avatar
Red
Addicted to PBF
Posts: 9519
Joined: Tue Dec 21, 2004 4:35 am
Location: SoCal

Postby Red » Sat Jan 12, 2008 11:59 pm

I have a bit of a problem with couples who are about to get married .No offense to you by all means, in general.I am afraid that new couples are still figuring out if it is going to work out.If it doesn't and they separate or divorce sometime the dog gets put in a difficult situation.
Be aware that many pit bull rescues won't adopt to households with resident dogs or small pets either (bunnies, cats, etc.) because of the risks.I know I don't (well now I don't have dogs for adoption!).But if that person who wants the dog has a great set up, experience, or is willing to follow up on guidelines one single exception can maybe me made.

Often a meeting with a person who might not exactly fit the standards on paper means more than rules.My suggestion is that you ask to meet with whoever has the dog you want and go from there.
Rules are there for a reason but that does not meant that one exceptional person is not worth a dog.I just never found one so I ended up with more dogs then what was planned. :tongue:

User avatar
pittymomma
Bully Ambassador
Posts: 2188
Joined: Tue Oct 26, 2004 7:02 pm
Location: www.bulliesinneed.ca
Contact:

Postby pittymomma » Sun Jan 13, 2008 6:09 am


I have a bit of a problem with couples who are about to get married .No offense to you by all means, in general.I am afraid that new couples are still figuring out if it is going to work out.If it doesn't and they separate or divorce sometime the dog gets put in a difficult situation.



That's a good point too Red.


What we do for b/f gf situtions or newly married or even common law is one person is taking sole responsibilty for the dog. We have a couple adopters whose relationships ended and the person on the contract is the one who ended up with the dog.

its not a set in stone way of getting around things but it does help.


Red- did you take in more dogs??

V

User avatar
chinsNdobermans
Bully Lover 4 Life
Posts: 1438
Joined: Mon Dec 17, 2007 12:22 pm
Location: WNY
Contact:

Postby chinsNdobermans » Sun Jan 13, 2008 8:38 am

I kind of hate that society has to think that way. Back in the day when marriage was a respected institution and divorce wasn't easier than working things out, no one would have had to say "well, you're just about to get married, yes, but what if you get a divorce?"

But back in those days the APBT was a respected canine, I guess.

I know you guys have to think like that for the safety of your dogs, and that's understandable, but today's society, in my opinion, sucks.

Now, I have chinchillas, yes, but they are kept in their own room. Lizz is allowed in their room because, well basically she's lower than all the cages and just plops down in the middle of the floor until I'm done. I don't allow any other dogs in there because 1. I don't trust them not to harass the chins and 2. I don't trust my chins not to entice them to do so.

My dog is a beagle mix, so she's a larger-sized small dog. Is that a factor?

I'm just asking a ton of questions because I want to know what to expect, if we feel ready to adopt in the next year or so. If we don't, then hey, whole different set of circumstances. I'd probably ask questions then too.

Thanks for all of the input.


Return to “Rescue Resources & Adoptable Dogs”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 9 guests