Kearney, MO

Discuss Breed Specific Legislation and local county laws on pit bull ownership.
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heather
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Kearney, MO

Postby heather » Wed Jul 20, 2011 3:49 pm

Kearney keeps pit bull




The Kearney Board of Aldermen took no action regarding its pit bull ban.



The ordinance was on the agenda for discussion at the meeting Monday, July 18, after a resident asked the local governing body to repeal its law banning the breed and breed types within the city limits.




Alderman Tom Patterson made a motion to change the ordinance, but it failed for lack of a second motion for a vote.




Aldermen Jeff Couchman and Dan Holt did not say anything during the discussion. Alderwoman Jenny Hayes was absent from the meeting.




Mayor Bill Dane noted it was not a public hearing, but board members could ask questions of the half dozen audience members there specifically for that issue. Patterson asked an opinion of one woman who was in favor of repealing the ordinance.




In a survey on the water bill last month, 591 respondents said keep the ban and 151 said change it.




Read more about the ban in next week’s edition.



http://www.kccommunitynews.com/kearney- ... etail.html

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Re: Kearney, MO

Postby heather » Sat Feb 01, 2014 4:07 pm

Group wants to repeal city-wide ban on pit bulls

By Dave Hon | Posted: Thursday, January 30, 2014


Half of Kearney City Hall was filled with residents who want to repeal the citywide ban on pit bulls when the subject came up at the Jan. 22 Board of Aldermen meeting.


The ordinance, which was passed in the summer of 2007, is facing opposition from a group of residets lead by Mason Hakes, a Kansas City resident and recent pit bull owner. Hakes said he works as a political advocate in the Kansas City area.


Hakes was asked by Chelsea Dylan and other Kearney residents to speak to the aldermen Jan. 22. Hakes said Dylan moved to Kearney with a pit bull and had to find another home for her dog after Kearney police officers discovered the animal in city limits.


“She was very emotional,” Hakes said. “She was crying outside of City Hall last night because she was unaware she could have done more to fight this. She thought there was nothing she could do to keep that dog in her home with her family.”


The ban allows officers to immediately seize unregistered pit bulls within the city limits without restrictions on the initial seizure.

The ban did allow for the registration of pit bulls already residing in city limits when it first went into effect, but City Administrator Jim Eldridge said no pit bulls had been grandfathered in.


“It’s not only an abuse of power, but it’s terribly, terribly intrusive to the citizens of Kearney,” Hakes said. “It’s a waste of taxpayer money.”


Hakes said breed bans had been defeated in courts across the country and any breed could be dangerous depending on the owner. Hakes said such bans were the remnants of stigmas from the 19th century.


“It is ignorant in the sense that people don’t take the time to educate themselves on the issues and on the breed specifically, but I would say it’s more outdated,” Hakes said.


Mayor Bill Dane said he supports the ban and doesn’t want to put children at risk in the city limits.


“Not all pit bulls are dangerous, but they have the potential to be dangerous,” Dane said. “They’re bred that way.”


Hakes and others are working to build relationships with aldermen. Currently, Alderman Tom Patterson supports a repeal of the ban.


“I think there should be a vicious dog ordinance,” Patterson said. “I don’t think saying a specific breed is the problem because, in fact. when we had the meeting last,there was a gal here from Gladstone, I believe she was in animal control, and I asked her specifically what types of dogs have you seen or which dogs have been the biggest problem, and she said she’s had more issues with smaller dogs than pit bulls.”


Patterson made a motion to repeal the ban in 2011, but the motion wasn’t seconded. Parliamentarian procedure dictates another member of the voting body must make the motion instead of Patterson. Hakes said he’s optimistic his relationship-building efforts will foster a compromise and a solution for Kearney residents who want to own a pit bull.

“I am choosing not to look at any negative views as opposition or obstacle rather than just another person that needs a little bit of education,” Hakes said.
Posted: Thursday, January 30, 2014 11:29 am

By Dave Hon | 1 comment

Half of Kearney City Hall was filled with residents who want to repeal the citywide ban on pit bulls when the subject came up at the Jan. 22 Board of Aldermen meeting.
The ordinance, which was passed in the summer of 2007, is facing opposition from a group of residets lead by Mason Hakes, a Kansas City resident and recent pit bull owner. Hakes said he works as a political advocate in the Kansas City area.
Hakes was asked by Chelsea Dylan and other Kearney residents to speak to the aldermen Jan. 22. Hakes said Dylan moved to Kearney with a pit bull and had to find another home for her dog after Kearney police officers discovered the animal in city limits.
“She was very emotional,” Hakes said. “She was crying outside of City Hall last night because she was unaware she could have done more to fight this. She thought there was nothing she could do to keep that dog in her home with her family.”
The ban allows officers to immediately seize unregistered pit bulls within the city limits without restrictions on the initial seizure. The ban did allow for the registration of pit bulls already residing in city limits when it first went into effect, but City Administrator Jim Eldridge said no pit bulls had been grandfathered in.
“It’s not only an abuse of power, but it’s terribly, terribly intrusive to the citizens of Kearney,” Hakes said. “It’s a waste of taxpayer money.”
Hakes said breed bans had been defeated in courts across the country and any breed could be dangerous depending on the owner. Hakes said such bans were the remnants of stigmas from the 19th century.
“It is ignorant in the sense that people don’t take the time to educate themselves on the issues and on the breed specifically, but I would say it’s more outdated,” Hakes said.
Mayor Bill Dane said he supports the ban and doesn’t want to put children at risk in the city limits.
“Not all pit bulls are dangerous, but they have the potential to be dangerous,” Dane said. “They’re bred that way.”
Hakes and others are working to build relationships with aldermen. Currently, Alderman Tom Patterson supports a repeal of the ban.
“I think there should be a vicious dog ordinance,” Patterson said. “I don’t think saying a specific breed is the problem because, in fact. when we had the meeting last,there was a gal here from Gladstone, I believe she was in animal control, and I asked her specifically what types of dogs have you seen or which dogs have been the biggest problem, and she said she’s had more issues with smaller dogs than pit bulls.”
Patterson made a motion to repeal the ban in 2011, but the motion wasn’t seconded. Parliamentarian procedure dictates another member of the voting body must make the motion instead of Patterson. Hakes said he’s optimistic his relationship-building efforts will foster a compromise and a solution for Kearney residents who want to own a pit bull.
“I am choosing not to look at any negative views as opposition or obstacle rather than just another person that needs a little bit of education,” Hakes said.
Kearney Editor Dave Hon can be reached at 628-6001 or at dave.hon@kearneycourier.com
- See more at: http://www.kearneycourier.com/news/arti ... s8X9M.dpuf


http://www.kearneycourier.com/news/arti ... ca5f0.html


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