Mast Cell Tumors : Lessons Learned

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Re: Mast Cell Tumors : Lessons Learned

Postby ilovetyson » Fri Jul 29, 2011 10:11 am

going to the vet today.. I am So stressed Ugh
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Re: Mast Cell Tumors : Lessons Learned

Postby ilovetyson » Fri Jul 29, 2011 5:00 pm

Well the one lump she has had.. was a fatty cist. But the ones on her leg that I found recently.. Worry my vet. She aspirated them. And says that they are a type of Connective tissue tumor. And highly suggests surgery and having them Biopsied.. :-/
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Re: Mast Cell Tumors : Lessons Learned

Postby mrgrimm » Fri Sep 16, 2011 9:52 pm

I know how hard it is to have sick dogs, or dying or dead dogs, but all I can say is don't worry too much and get yourself down over anything that happens. Doggies can sense your worry and you don't want them to see thier leader upset! Just cherish every moment, and know that no matter what happens there isn't a dog more loved in this world than your own. My beloved Debo (Rottweiler I found 10 years ago, estimate he's 12 now) has developed lumps all over his rib cage/belly over the last couple years and as sad as it is, it's a reminder to me to make the most of every day while I can with him. I send my best wishes out to all of you and your dogs, hey we are all going to die and none of us know when, no biggie, right? :run:
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Re: Mast Cell Tumors : Lessons Learned

Postby PitBull-Lady » Sat Sep 17, 2011 4:53 pm

not really sure what that last poster was saying. but I found it very disrespectful to our concerned pet-parents on the forum who are looking for constructive answers to health issues.

The Topic of this post is "RIP Rowdy".
viewtopic.php?f=2&t=149915

It is so sad that our beloved JoeBingo's dog Rowdy passed away from Mast Cell tumors.
Joe's info in the link calenders the quick progression of the tumors. It really does happen 'that' quick.
Thanks Jamie for posting the pics.

jamielvsaustin wrote:Image
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Re: Mast Cell Tumors : Lessons Learned

Postby mrgrimm » Mon Sep 19, 2011 11:41 am

PitBull-Lady wrote:not really sure what that last poster was saying. but I found it very disrespectful to our concerned pet-parents on the forum who are looking for constructive answers to health issues.



I apologize if that offended anyone, don't see how it could have but I did not have any bad intentions and was just trying to cheer people up and let them know they aren't alone. I am a new member here and will not be a stranger in the future so I don't want to start off on the wrong foot here with anyone.
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Re: Mast Cell Tumors : Lessons Learned

Postby jamielvsaustin » Mon Sep 19, 2011 12:45 pm

PitBull-Lady wrote:Image
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I just wanted to clarify these pictures, these were taken after Rowdy went to the vet and the vet poked and prodded him. One was soon after the visit, and if I remember correctly the other was later that night.

:(

We had a lump on Bailey removed a short while ago. It was a stage 1 grade 1 hemangiosarcoma. Typically that is a cancer found in the blood vessels and her's was on her skin. She had to retire from donating blood because of it. She healed perfectly and you'd never know she had any surgery.

After reading about Rowdy I checked our dogs over for anything unusual...Bailey has another lump. :( She goes in tomorrow to have the vet look at it, I'm going to ask them to look at her all over-and then I want that thing gone. Based on her other bump and her sister's history I'm pretty sure if Bailey lives long enough this will be what kills her. It tears me up thinking about it. Austin and I had a talk about it and reminded ourselves we want quality not quanity so for as long as Bailey is happy and comfortable we will do what we can to fight for her.

I hate cancer. It scares me so much it makes me consider not having future pets.
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Re: Mast Cell Tumors : Lessons Learned

Postby mrgrimm » Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:14 pm

jamielvsaustin wrote:I hate cancer. It scares me so much it makes me consider not having future pets.


See this is the mindset that I try to get people not to have. First, I send the best wishes to everyone and thier pets, and all life is a miracle as we all know by the love we feel with our pets. The fact is that great owners, like jamielvsaustin seem to be outnumbered by horrible owners, and the dog population isn't shrinking. Just because we have a hard time dealing with our beloved pets' unfortunate circumstances doesn't mean we should shut out the possibility of helping out another poor dog in the future, even if we do only get to spend a short amount of time with him/her, at least it was good while it lasted. I repect everyone in this thread for the information and the desire to raise happy healthy pets, but it kills me to see people say things like this. Hopefully my opinion this time does not offend anyone, and I will gladly stay away from this thread in the future if you guys want me to, but I think it's very important for us humans to remain strong and keep things positve for our dog's sake.
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Re: Mast Cell Tumors : Lessons Learned

Postby jamielvsaustin » Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:26 pm

mrgrimm wrote:
jamielvsaustin wrote:I hate cancer. It scares me so much it makes me consider not having future pets.


See this is the mindset that I try to get people not to have.

Basically the same thing my husband said about Bailey overall and future dogs. Why should a dog miss out on the great life we can provide it-even for only a short period of time simply because it's scary. They're not scared, they have no idea. All they know is that right now this game of fetch/tug-a-war/whatever is the best thing ever. I agree. I think he's right (and ultimately you too) but I'm a sissy. For now, I don't need to worry about it because it's not happening...and who knows it may never happen. But I'm just that kind of a person I guess.
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Re: Mast Cell Tumors : Lessons Learned

Postby PitBull-Lady » Fri Nov 04, 2011 7:04 am

From another thread, we have some more good consise info from a member, tiva has a wealth of knowledge here >>>

posting.php?mode=quote&f=2&p=1972517
tiva wrote:You might want to post over on the health page, and you should also consider joining the Yahoo group for mast cell tumors in dogs.

My Tiva has had mast cell tumors twice (both stage II, same as your dog), and she's still chugging along at age 16. MCT is NOT always a death sentence, and the survival rates are increasing all the time. THere are also TONS of new treatment options, particularly with advances in chemotherapy (which is much less painful for dogs than for people).

Here's a good overview: http://www.caninecancer.com/Mast.html

What you should consider doing right away:
1. Get the pathology report, if you haven't already. You need to know the mitotic index (ie, how active the cancer cells are at growing), and you need to know how clean and large the margins were
2. If the pathology report shows that the margins are clean and complete (ie, they got all the tumor out), stage II cancers are usually considered cured. So a good diet, with supplemental tumeric, CoEnzyme Q 10, and omega 3 fatty acids, are all great ideas, but chemo and additional surgery usually aren't recommended.
3. If the pathology report shows that the margins were not clean and large (ie, some of the tumor may still be in there), then the dog's chance of survival will be increased if you do more. Go to a specialist if you possibly can! Additional surgery, or radiation, or chemo are the usual choices that your oncologist will offer you. Our Tiva's first MCT was Stage 11, bad margins, so we chose additional surgery (her MCT was in her tail, and amputating the tail was a great option and curative completely, since the cancer hadn't gotten to her lymph nodes). Tiva's second MCT was also stage II, bad margins, but an extremely low mitotic index. We decided not to try chemo, because Tiva was so old at the time and it wouldn't increase her survival chances by much. But if she had been younger, or if the MCT had a higher mitotic index, we would have gone with chemo. The options now for chemo are great--pills that have few side effects, for example, such as Palladia. They are expensive.

There really are lots of options, and survival is increasing for MCT dogs, so get the pathology report, discuss your options with your vet, and ask for a referral to a cancer specialist if there's one nearby. Good luck!!
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Re: Mast Cell Tumors : Lessons Learned

Postby PitBull-Lady » Sun Apr 15, 2012 8:06 pm

I meant to post this before, but there is another sufferer who sounds like they are doing pretty good so far.
Read on about 'Socks'.


viewtopic.php?f=5&t=152970

Image[/quote]
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Re: Mast Cell Tumors : Lessons Learned

Postby julie64 » Mon Apr 16, 2012 3:46 am

This is one thread I wish would stop growing. Shay lost her fight in Nov and I hope I don't have to ever post anymore dogs in this thread.
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Re: Mast Cell Tumors : Lessons Learned

Postby PitBull-Lady » Mon Apr 16, 2012 7:16 pm

julie64 wrote:This is one thread I wish would stop growing. Shay lost her fight in Nov and I hope I don't have to ever post anymore dogs in this thread.


Poor Shay. She was such a dear member of the forum AND not to mention your life and heart.
I wish that your words were true. That would be a great - amazing - wonderful - fantastic thing to happen.
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Re: Mast Cell Tumors : Lessons Learned

Postby PitBull-Lady » Mon Apr 16, 2012 7:18 pm

viewtopic.php?f=5&t=153256

there is some really good info about supplements and Booker's mom tells info about what they have been doing as well as what their oncologist appointment was like.

Here is a picture of the 'pit bulls' looking like labs :)
Image
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Re: Mast Cell Tumors : Lessons Learned

Postby PitBull-Lady » Wed Jun 20, 2012 9:08 pm

How this never popped up in the search I'm not sure, :dunno: but here is the text about Tiva's tail amputation and healing success. Congrats Tiva!

viewtopic.php?f=5&t=94090
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Re: Mast Cell Tumors : Lessons Learned

Postby kimboley » Wed Oct 31, 2012 5:41 pm

My female, she is about 7 years, no litters, fixed, has a growth on her vulva and a small bump on her side. Has anybody seen this type of growth before?

Image

the bump on her side is about the size of a pencil eraser.

The vet has seen these, she said "I wouldn't worry unless it gets bigger" well it has recently gotten bigger. Any idea what I should be prepared for?
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