Head collars

Tricks, obedience, behavior, and more.
Shylee
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Re: Re:

Postby Shylee » Thu Jan 28, 2010 5:14 pm

kaytenmags wrote:if not, there's also the "canny collar" (sp?). i think that's available in England, and it works on the same principle (attaches at the back too). :)

Ah i just googled it, i believe i saw something like that the other day, may have to give it a try!

Thanks :D

Grinsomx
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Re: Head collars

Postby Grinsomx » Mon Mar 08, 2010 12:22 pm

not sure how correct this is but....
i had a vet tell me that any collar that goes around the head or neck can hurt the dog in time, even to the point that it requires surgery at an older age.
so i swear by the harness, it also makes it easy to pick up the dog if needed.
my dog responds better to the harness as well :thumbsup:

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AllisonPitbullLvr
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Re: Head collars

Postby AllisonPitbullLvr » Tue Apr 13, 2010 12:14 pm

Misskiwi67 wrote:I LOVE head collars!!!

I originally trained both my dogs to the gentle leader, but now have a halti for Sheila after stepping on the plastic buckle and breaking her GL... having tried both, I'm sortof indifferent, I think they both work well.

Romeo now walks on a flat leash, mostly because he tries to rub the head collar on people he meets, and being greeted by a dog rubbing his head between your legs is awkward.

I recommend gentle leaders to my clients because if they buy the right set, it comes with an EXCELLENT training video.

As for the "muzzle" association... I carry treats with me all the time anyway, so when someone asks why the dog is muzzled, I feed a treat and say "actually, its just a halter, like they use on horses" and I use it because she's so big that if she takes off after a squirrel, this way I don't end up doing a faceplant... people suddenly understand. And honestly, head halters are so common these days, most people already know what they are.


+1 on all of the above :) I especially love the head rubbing comment...people in the elevator LOVE it when Obi does that. lol

If I am walking my dogs one at a time, I use a martingale collar. I can physically manage one of them even if they decide to chase after a squirrel or some ducks, etc. But when I am walking the two of them together, I HAVE to have them on a head halter because I can't physcally manage all 160lbs of dog. They walk nicely and are well-mannered until they see some distraction and then they get each other so worked up that neither of them hear me. I use a Gentle Leader with Obi because on occasion, he will still try to slip it off with his paws. For Buddy Girl I can use the Halti which has a padded nose strap but doesn't tighten under her chin because she has no problem whatsoever wearing it.

I agree that whatever works for you to be able to have a nice, relaxing walk with your dogs is good. No one wants your daily walks to be constant fighting for control.

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lilangel
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Re: Head collars

Postby lilangel » Sun Feb 20, 2011 12:39 pm

Wow. I just read some of the beginning of this thread. Quite a debate. I'd just like to add, for newbies who will read this thread, that a lot of the earlier arguments about head halters not working for some "sensitive" dogs who freak out are kind of strange. Anyone can say they introduced the halter correctly and over time, but that does not mean they actually introduced the halter correctly over an adequate period of time or that they managed the early stages of the halter's use correctly. Proper introduction of a head halter from removing it from the package to having it accepted by the dog takes time. TIME>>>> for some dogs that will mean 2 days, for others it will mean 2 months or 6 months depending on how often you use it and how sensitive the dog is to having something on her face. It generally takes a week or two.

Having used head halters on extreme dogs, highly reactive & aggressive dogs, (dogs that will bite strangers if they are even touched,) extremely powerful working dogs, Malinois, Dutchie, APBT, Husky, GSD, AB, Golden, Lab, Beagle, Spitz, Poodle etc. etc.etc. I can share my experience that introduced correctly, a head halter is a viable option as a training tool for any dog larger than a teacup with a muzzle and will not inflict any injuries to a typical healthy dog if used properly by an aware owner. That does not mean putting your powerful dog in a HAlti on a flexi and letting them run 15 feet full speed to hit the end of the lead full force! The arguments about dogs cranking on their necks indicate improper use of the equipment and/ or management of the dog, not an equipment flaw. If the dog is on a 6 foot lead there is no way it can hurt itself during a training session. As the OP stated: people train dogs, tools do not train dogs.

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AllisonPitbullLvr
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Re: Head collars

Postby AllisonPitbullLvr » Mon Feb 21, 2011 8:10 pm

:goodpost:

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haircrazie016
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Re: Re:

Postby haircrazie016 » Mon Feb 21, 2011 9:35 pm

Shylee wrote:
kaytenmags wrote:
pitgrrl wrote:Has anyone had any experience with a Newtrix head halter?

I'm just curious because I have heard from a few people that they far prefer it to a Halti or Gentle Leader.

yes! i have one of these for maggie and i REALLY prefer it over the GL/halti. Reason being, it doesn't pull her head around from the front. it also has a 'safety clip' that connects to the D-ring on her collar.

maggie isn't much of a puller, but i used this for some time while she was getting used to living in my condo building. she needed to learn that not everyone in the elevator/stairway/lobby was there to pay attention to her, and their little yappy (vicious!) dogs were not food.

the newtrix harness basically took away her strength/leverage, so i could hold her back with minimal effort. this, combined with training, means i now have a much more polite dog, even tho she rarely wears the head harness now.

fantastic product! :thumbsup:



*Must buy one, must buy one*

Halti's and Cody do not work together, he still pulls and usually finds a way to swipe them off his nose, it seems i can never get them tight enough, he has a LARGE neck and a strange nose <_<
Keona sulks when wearing one but behaves a lot better, though she does make me feel bad after a few minutes so i end up taking it off and praising her quite a bit. I relent, but she usually desrves it. My dogs do usually use harness's though.

As for the Newtrix H/H can you get them in england? =/


this was my favorite head halter that we've used! I tried the GL and the Halti, but the newtrix was definitely the best for the same reasons you said, I liked that it didnt pull her face to the side, and the safety clip, I also really liked the padding over the nose, but unfortunately no amount of hot dogs would get piggie to accept it, or any head halter for that matter. But I have brought it to class for other dogs, and I really really love it!!

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smven
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Re: Head collars

Postby smven » Fri Mar 11, 2011 9:50 pm

I use a halti for GiGi the 2yr APBT I just adopted. I feel like they are like all training aids and should be used carefully and correctly. I don't believe that all dogs benefit from them but some do. The main thing I don't like is that they closely resemble muzzles which promotes the pitbull aggression stereotype.

GiGi is high energy, high prey drive, dog aggressive (out of insecurities) , and very wary of strangers. Neck collars and harnesses don't work because she just drops down low and pulls right through them. The head collar was necessary #1 for control so she doesn't get herself in a bad position with people/other animals. #2 it refocuses her attention and puts her in a state of mind to hear direction. There is no reason to use it in a harsh way and as her confidence and calm continues to increase and her relationship with me as her handler increases then the halti will no longer be needed. For her it is not a overbearing or enslaving tool, but rather a way to better communication when she gets in that tense agitated frame of mind.

I adopted my Boxer as a 4yr old and he pulled like crazy the head-collar was not a good option for him and neither was a neck collar as he has very sensitive skin and both put strain on his spine. I used a Holt harness with him and it was the tool he needed to get his focus without harming him. The halti was not a good option for him as it was uncomfortable and hurtful to his pride so he fought like crazy or dragged along depressed. He still has more to learn/work on (don't we all) but he walks like a gentleman on or off leash.

I am not a dog trainer but have learned a lot in general by training horses. My conclusion is treat all training aids and tools like what they are, aids for better communication, also with care and respect. No Training method works for every individual animal and you need to hear it when they tell what works for them. I feel like it all comes down to relationship and communication. Training should be a positive bonding thing :) at least thats my opinion

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Shutterwolf
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Re: Head collars

Postby Shutterwolf » Sun Feb 12, 2012 7:36 pm

i personally use the halti on my girl, without it, she will yank my arm off... and i tried the gentle leader harness where you connect to the front of the chest, and she was still able to pull, just kinda sideways instead of straight on.

i have had an issue where she slipped the halti off her muzzle once, but only once and thanks to the safety connection and her good off leash training, she wasn't trying to take off. during a normal walk, she doesn't seem to pull that much but at the pet expo with lots of dogs and people she was pulling all day till she finally got tired and settled down.

another problem i have is she knows when the halti is on and when it isn't. so soon as shes doing good and i take the halti off, she is right back to pulling again... not sure how to stop her from doing this, but i hope once i get her into obedience and agility, that might stop? lol

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Re: Head collars

Postby randomroads » Wed Oct 10, 2012 8:30 am

The allure of the head harness baffles me. Horses wear halters and bridles because they are hundreds of pounds heavier than us, and even then a very well trained horse does not need either of them and it's more in compliance with barn or local laws. Horses do not care if they are dragging around a 200 pound person by their head because they are strong enough to do it.

In my opinion dogs should never wear something wrapping around their face unless it's a muzzle, because you don't control a dog's direction of movement with a muzzle. I fail to see the point in giving corrections by forcing a dog's head to turn. If you're incapable of walking your dog on a loose leash with a flat collar, you need to learn how to train your dog to walk on a loose leash on a flat collar.

It doesn't help that I've seen a LOT of idiots recently with head harnesses on their large breed dogs. The harnesses were cutting into the dogs faces, pushing against the eyes, distorting the lay of the lips. The owners were allow the dog to drag them around, yanking on the dog's head, yelling at the dog. It's abuse. You can't inflict this kind of abuse using a flat collar. Just like e-collars and prongs can be abused, I've seen more abuse coming from a head harness than I have seen 'proper' use of one. Encouraging idiots to use them does nothing but cause issues.

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Re: Head collars

Postby MarMar » Wed Oct 10, 2012 9:52 am

I don't use head halters to control my dogs' pulling. They are quite capable of walking on a loose leash, and I do agree that if a dog is walking and continuously pulling into a head halter the entire walk, then there are some underlying things that need to be addressed (although I'm not convinced that this is worse than spending an entire walk pulling into a flat collar). I use head halters as a tool to be prepared with reactivity. It allows me to maneuver more quickly and efficiently in the case of a situation where I need to move quickly, or have control over the head in case a dog rushes us unexpectedly. I don't use them to force my dogs to move somewhere or force them to stop barking. For me, they are an invaluable tool.

For general walking purposes I would prefer a harness to a flat collar in any case. And a person who is jerking the dog around on a head halter will certainly jerk them around on a flat collar. This is not the head halter's fault. I know the argument is made that "any tool can be dangerous in the wrong hands"; however, I do make a distinction between tools that are intended for non-harmful use, such as a head halter, and tools that are intended to be aversive, such as prongs and e collars.

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Re: Head collars

Postby Amie » Wed Oct 10, 2012 10:17 am

MarMar wrote:I do make a distinction between tools that are intended for non-harmful use, such as a head halter, and tools that are intended to be aversive, such as prongs and e collars.


The key is when the tool is being used properly. Prongs and e-collars are supposed to hurt. It's how they "work". When you're using them as intended, you're causing pain. That's not handler error. Pain inflicted using a head halter comes from handler error - it is not as the product is intended.

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AllisonPitbullLvr
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Re: Head collars

Postby AllisonPitbullLvr » Wed Oct 10, 2012 12:25 pm

Amie wrote:
MarMar wrote:I do make a distinction between tools that are intended for non-harmful use, such as a head halter, and tools that are intended to be aversive, such as prongs and e collars.


The key is when the tool is being used properly. Prongs and e-collars are supposed to hurt. It's how they "work". When you're using them as intended, you're causing pain. That's not handler error. Pain inflicted using a head halter comes from handler error - it is not as the product is intended.


:goodpost:

I routinely use a gentle leader with Obi. His leash manners go out the window when he sees a squirrel and he is bigger and stronger than I am. In addition, it has been invaluable when off leash dogs have rushed out at us because I can control his head, avoid him biting the other dog, all without damaging his trachea in the process.

It's a tool. People use all kinds of tools improperly. It all comes down to owner education.

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Re: Head collars

Postby Celesteandthebullies » Wed Oct 10, 2012 1:38 pm

When I'm going into crowded places with Dakota (like the hospital or a restaurant) I put his halti on until we get settled somewhere. He doesn't pull or anything, just makes it easier to navigate around things and he tends to stick very close to my side. (I've had people walk in between me and him before, even though he was only a foot or so away:dunno: )

Once we're settled, I take it off.


With Alice I use when entering a new environment, I normally don't have to leave it on long. Or with other dogs in the picture that I don't know. (that may be reactive as well)

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Re: Head collars

Postby Red » Wed Oct 10, 2012 10:46 pm

randomroads wrote:It doesn't help that I've seen a LOT of idiots recently with head harnesses on their large breed dogs. The harnesses were cutting into the dogs faces, pushing against the eyes, distorting the lay of the lips. The owners were allow the dog to drag them around, yanking on the dog's head, yelling at the dog. It's abuse. You can't inflict this kind of abuse using a flat collar.


What you saw does not help, I am familiar with it too and don't like it a bit, but I am guessing you have not seen something similar done by people whose dogs are wearing a simple flat collar. While a flat collar does not directly operate on a dog's muzzle, there is plenty of damage that can be done by the use of it and a leash, when people use excessive force or in certain situations.

I fail to see the point in giving corrections by forcing a dog's head to turn.


It shouldn't be a correction, it should be gentle pressure. In those situations in which a gentle pressure is not giving any result, one should step into the dog's shoulder to move the animal, to avoid unfair pulling and yanking. The handler should also consider why the dog is not responding, and make changes without ending up using the collar in an inappropriate manner.Yanking or forcefully maneuvering a dog's head around with a head collar is not appropriate, especially when someone is merely having a "my dog is pulling on walks" type of training issue . Jerking on a simple flat collar when a dog is reacting to another out of fear, to name and example of a less than ideal use of a flat collar, is not appropriate either.

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Re: Head collars

Postby Naomi » Sat Oct 13, 2012 6:34 pm

I quite like head collars for the beginnibg stages of training your dog not to pull. I am most certainly not an experienced dog owner but my boy is stronger than me. Don't get me wrong he can't pull me over but he actually hurts me he pulls that much. And if he sees another dog he acts up and i cant pull him out of the way if necessary. I have the help of a behaviourist atm as hes has dog agression issues through fear and seperation anxiety. I have used halti and gentle leader and didn't like either. Ended up near his eyes and the halti actually gave him an ulcer on his eye. I then got a canny collar which i did like, it did work but the strap was so easy to pull off his nose and took ages to pull back out and put back on. You'll have to google them to see ehat i mean. But the behaviourist suggested a dogmatic head collar. Its amazing. Very padded. Is unable to gef it off his nose. He doesnt try to pull the strap from behind his ears so cant comment on that. He really doesnt react to It at all where he did with the others. There are teo things that put my off. One: it doesnt attach to his regular collar so i use a double lead. Two: there are metal rings on the side which looked uncomfortable but i have pulled it (as if he was pulling) and put my fingers underneath and they dont dog in so must just not look great. They also come in lots of different material collars, diamonte ones, different collar reflective ones and soft padded leather ones that come in different collars also.

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