Picking a Vet.

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Picking a Vet.

Postby Fish » Fri Aug 27, 2004 6:28 am

Have two Vets from which to choose for Harley, one I have been told is more expensive that the other one (I have been told). Is a Vet. a Vet. or should I be looking at certin things before making my choice?
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Postby mnp13 » Fri Aug 27, 2004 6:46 am

A vet is NOT a vet!!!

You should meet with both of them and see how they interact with your dog, and how they interact with you. You want to know where they graduated from and when, contact the BBB and see if there are any complaints on them, etc.

There are quack Doctors, and there are quack vets.

Michelle
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Postby elegy » Fri Aug 27, 2004 9:21 am

price isn't necessarily a good indicator.

i'd come up with a list of questions about things that are important to you- for me it would be stuff like vaccine protocols, how often they feel routine bloodwork should be done, what kind of pain medications, anesthesia. not that i'm planning on needing to put my dog under, but a) you never know, and b) it gives me an idea of how progressive a vet they are.

if money is an issue for you, you want to ask what kind of payment plans they offer. just in case the unthinkable happens.

i think it's important to have a vet you're comfortable with and a vet you mesh with. i also think it's important to have a vet who will work *with* you.
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Postby barbponys » Fri Aug 27, 2004 11:38 am

I agree with Elegy. I have a vet that isn't "holisitic" but he knows that I am where possible. He's very open to alternative treatments. A progressive vet will be open to different foods, not a hardliner for what he carries, understand caution with vaccines, pilling isn't always the answer.......etc. Expense doesn't always mean better. Mine is very reasonable and very good.

Having questions to ask is good. If you aren't sure of the answer ask more questions. If they don't want to take the time to make you feel comfortable or interact with your dog.............move on. If your dog is uneasy around them.......... think twice. If he is reserved around strangers then that's a different matter. Just my .02 cents
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Postby Fish » Fri Aug 27, 2004 4:10 pm

Money really isn't a question and I shouldn't have put anything about that in my question. I was just sitting here reading some post in the Forum and a light went off in my head to ask the Forum what I should do, have been trying to figure out whish Vet. to use. Both are fairley close to my house but figured I would ask here to see what criteria other folks here use in picking a Vet., thanks for the advice.
Fish
 

Postby Leslie H » Fri Aug 27, 2004 4:53 pm

How about asking them what their policy on vaccinations is. Do they want to give adult dogs everything every year, or are they willing to do every 3 years, or titer? What do they have for a sytem of covering emergencies? Do they use someone nearby, or are they available, or do they send you to a 24 hr clinic?
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Postby Fish » Fri Aug 27, 2004 10:28 pm

Those are good questions Leslie, I will ask those questions, never thought about what I might do if there were an emergencie.
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Postby mnp13 » Fri Aug 27, 2004 11:10 pm

The first time I went to Ruby's current vet office I told the vet I saw with her exactly what I expected of a vet: That they know me and my dog on sight, I did not expect to have to explain her history every time I went in. Ruby was a breeding dog at that time, and I was quite clear that it was not going to change, as she was under contract and I didn't want flack for it. Needless to say, that vet was not amused with my 'demands' and gave me quiute the cold shoulder.

I gave the practice a second try, saw a different vet, said all the same stuff to her and she said she understood and would be happy to get to know me and Ruby. We now only see her when we go in.

I come from a medical family, and I know a few vets so though I deeply respect all medical professionals I do know the 'right' way to challenge them and make them explain what's going on.

I treat my pets as if they were my children - and a vet that does not understand that or respect that will not get along well with me. My last vet muzzled my dog and pinned her to the table right in front of me, against my wishes - it was the last time I EVER walked into that office. (My last dog, not Ruby)

You must be comfortable and happy with the vet, the office staff and the practice in general. Give them each an interview and go from there.

Michelle
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Postby barbponys » Sat Aug 28, 2004 12:39 am

Very good point Michelle. There are 3 vets in the clinic I go to. I see the owner and have for .......... oh jeez..........12 yrs? The other two don't believe in raw and have specifically told friends of mine that raw will kill their dog................they now see Bill too. One mis-diagnosed 2 of my boxers and it ended up being cancer both times...........she sees my birds, never my dogs or cat. If Bill isn't available and it isn't an emergency I wait. There's no lack of respect on either side, I like both ladies fine, they just won't see my dogs. The staff is awesome. The two managers are great, one has 3 pits and the whole office is VERY pit friendly. When there are new receptionists one of the managers makes it a point to introduce them to the long term clients, it's a great office over all. I live about 30 miles from my vet. I used to live across the river from them and walk the dogs to their visits. I've moved further and further out but I won't go anywhere else.
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