Things to avoid feeding your dog!

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Things to avoid feeding your dog!

Postby bahamutt99 » Sat Feb 10, 2007 12:49 am

Originally posted by Pitmomma. Thought everybody should see this.

Items to avoid Reasons to avoid

Alcoholic beverages Can cause intoxication, coma, and death.

Baby food Can contain onion powder, which can be toxic to dogs. (Please see onion below.) Can also result in nutritional deficiencies, if fed in large amounts.

Bones from fish, poultry, or other meat source Can cause obstruction or eslaceration of the digestive system.

Cat food Generally too high in protein and fats.

Chocolate, coffee, tea, and other caffeine Contain caffeine, theobromine, or theophylline, which can be toxic and affect the heart and nervous systems. Cocoa powder and cooking chocolate are the most toxic forms of chocolate. A 10-kilogram dog can be seriously affected if it eats a quarter of a 250gm packet of cocoa powder or half of a 250gm block of cooking chocolate. These forms of chocolate contain ten times more theobromine than milk chocolate. Thus, a chocolate mud cake could be a real health risk for a small dog. Even licking a substantial part of the chocolate icing from a cake can make a dog unwell.


Citrus oil extracts Can cause vomiting.

Fat trimmings Can cause pancreatitis.

Grapes and raisins Contain an unknown toxin, which can damage the kidneys.

Hops Unknown compound causes panting, increased heart rate, elevated temperature, seizures, and death.

Human vitamin supplements containing iron Can damage the lining of the digestive system and be toxic to the other organs including the liver and kidneys.

Large amounts of liver Can cause Vitamin A toxicity, which affects muscles and bones.

Macadamia nuts Contain an unknown toxin, which can affect the digestive and nervous systems and muscle.

Marijuana Can depress the nervous system, cause vomiting, and changes in the heart rate.

Milk and other dairy products Some adult dogs and cats do not have sufficient amounts of the enzyme lactase, which breaks down the lactose in milk. This can result in diarrhea. Lactose-free milk products are available for pets.

Moldy or spoiled food, garbage Can contain multiple toxins causing vomiting and diarrhea and can also affect other organs.

Mushrooms Can contain toxins, which may affect multiple systems in the body, cause shock, and result in death.

Onions and garlic (raw, cooked, or powder) Contain sulfoxides and disulfides, which can damage red blood cells and cause anemia. Cats are more susceptible than dogs. Garlic is less toxic than onions.

Persimmons Seeds can cause intestinal obstruction and enteritis.

Pits from peaches and plums Can cause obstruction of the digestive tract.

Potato, rhubarb, and tomato leaves; potato and tomato stems Contain oxalates, which can affect the digestive, nervous, and urinary systems. This is more of a problem in livestock.

Raw eggs Contain an enzyme called avidin, which decreases the absorption of biotin (a B vitamin). This can lead to skin and hair coat problems. Raw eggs may also contain Salmonella.

Raw fish Can result in a thiamine (a B vitamin) deficiency leading to loss of appetite, seizures, and in severe cases, death. More common if raw fish is fed regularly.

Salt If eaten in large quantities it may lead to electrolyte imbalances.

String Can become trapped in the digestive system; called a "string foreign body."

Sugary foods Can lead to obesity, dental problems, and possibly diabetes mellitus.

Table scraps (in large amounts) Table scraps are not nutritionally balanced. They should never be more than 10% of the diet. Fat should be trimmed from meat; bones should not be fed.

Tobacco Contains nicotine, which affects the digestive and nervous systems. Can result in rapid heart beat, collapse, coma, and death.

Yeast dough Can expand and produce gas in the digestive system, causing pain and possible rupture of the stomach or intestines.


ETA:

White chocolate: 200 ounces per pound of body weight. It takes 250 pounds of white chocolate to cause signs of poisoning in a 20-pound dog, 125 pounds for a 10-pound dog.

Milk chocolate: 1 ounce per pound of body weight. Approximately one pound of milk chocolate is poisonous to a 20-pound dog; one-half pound for a 10-pound dog. The average chocolate bar contains 2 to 3 ounces of milk chocolate. It would take 2-3 candy bars to poison a 10 pound dog. Semi-sweet chocolate has a similar toxic level.

Sweet cocoa: 0.3 ounces per pound of body weight. One-third of a pound of sweet cocoa is toxic to a 20-pound dog; 1/6 pound for a 10-pound dog.

Baking chocolate: 0.1 ounce per pound body weight. Two one-ounce squares of bakers' chocolate is toxic to a 20-pound dog; one ounce for a 10-pound dog.
Last edited by bahamutt99 on Sat Feb 10, 2007 3:55 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby IamaDick » Sat Feb 10, 2007 10:45 am

One thing


Raw eggs Contain an enzyme called avidin, which decreases the absorption of biotin (a B vitamin). This can lead to skin and hair coat problems. Raw eggs may also contain Salmonella.


I feed eggs regularly and have no problems whatsoever.
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Postby msvette2u » Sat Feb 10, 2007 11:42 am

I don't think this was meant as a discussion/argument section??
BTW do not feed raw salmon from the Pacific Ocean.
http://www.vetmed.wsu.edu/ClientED/salmon.asp

Salmon Poisoning Disease is a potentially fatal condition seen in dogs that eat certain types of raw fish. Salmon (salmonid fish) and other anadromous fish (fish that swim upstream to breed) can be infected with a parasite called Nanophyetus salmincola. Overall, the parasite is relatively harmless. The danger occurs when the parasite itself is infected with a rickettsial organism called Neorickettsia helminthoeca. It’s this microorganism that causes salmon poisoning.
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Postby IamaDick » Sat Feb 10, 2007 11:45 am

msvette2u wrote:I don't think this was meant as a discussion/argument section??
BTW do not feed raw salmon from the Pacific Ocean.
http://www.vetmed.wsu.edu/ClientED/salmon.asp

Salmon Poisoning Disease is a potentially fatal condition seen in dogs that eat certain types of raw fish. Salmon (salmonid fish) and other anadromous fish (fish that swim upstream to breed) can be infected with a parasite called Nanophyetus salmincola. Overall, the parasite is relatively harmless. The danger occurs when the parasite itself is infected with a rickettsial organism called Neorickettsia helminthoeca. It’s this microorganism that causes salmon poisoning.


If you freeze it for 3 weeks it will kill that parasite. I actually suggest freezing all RAW meats for this time just because im a nut.

Well im not trying to start arguments or a debate, im just asking why that would be on the list.
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Postby concreterose » Sat Feb 10, 2007 11:54 am

There are a few items on that list that I question.
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Postby bahamutt99 » Sat Feb 10, 2007 3:54 pm

I feed one or two things on that list as well. Its just general information. Somebody wanted a sticky specifically on grape toxicity, and I didn't see the point of that since there are many things which can be toxic. This was the most comprehensive list I knew of.
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Postby Purr » Sat Feb 10, 2007 5:16 pm

bahamutt99 wrote:I feed one or two things on that list as well. Its just general information. Somebody wanted a sticky specifically on grape toxicity, and I didn't see the point of that since there are many things which can be toxic. This was the most comprehensive list I knew of.



LOL I wanted a sticky on grape toxicity because I didn't know just how many things there are out there that can be toxic. Crazy. Thanks for putting it up, though. It's good info 8)
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Postby snoopsnoop » Sun Feb 11, 2007 9:03 pm

One thing on the top of my head to add: Apple Seeds. They contain cyanide and can develop cyanide poisoning from the seeds.
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Postby Purr » Sun Feb 11, 2007 9:26 pm

snoopsnoop wrote:One thing on the top of my head to add: Apple Seeds. They contain cyanide and can develop cyanide poisoning from the seeds.



OMG.... :eek: I didn't know that.... Thanks for the headsup, Snoop :thumbsup:
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Postby meginok » Wed Feb 21, 2007 12:34 pm

Per a recent discussion, xylitol (artificial sweetener - often found in chewing gum) is toxic to dogs, affecting liver function.
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Postby jestBC » Wed Feb 21, 2007 1:03 pm

snoopsnoop wrote:One thing on the top of my head to add: Apple Seeds. They contain cyanide and can develop cyanide poisoning from the seeds.

Hmmmm...there are whole apples in my dog food..
http://www.naturapet.com/display.php?d=inn-home
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Postby snoopsnoop » Wed Feb 21, 2007 1:08 pm

jestBC wrote:
snoopsnoop wrote:One thing on the top of my head to add: Apple Seeds. They contain cyanide and can develop cyanide poisoning from the seeds.

Hmmmm...there are whole apples in my dog food..
http://www.naturapet.com/display.php?d=inn-home


As there are in my dog's food. But in his food, there are chunks of freeze dried apples rather than in the kibble. perhaps contact the company and ask them if the apples are peeled/cored prior to processing.
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Postby chako » Wed Feb 21, 2007 1:09 pm

Avocado is also one of those "might be harmful" foods, though a LOT of people feed it with no problems. Look up Avocado toxicity in dogs, though on google, for a plethora of information.

And MOST seeds have the same issues as apple seeds, actually.
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Postby snoopsnoop » Wed Feb 21, 2007 1:11 pm

chako wrote:Avocado is also one of those "might be harmful" foods, though a LOT of people feed it with no problems. Look up Avocado toxicity in dogs, though on google, for a plethora of information.

And MOST seeds have the same issues as apple seeds, actually.


All the more reason to not feed seeds :thumbsup:

What about AvoDerm foods? They use avocado in their food for skin health boosters...
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Postby chako » Wed Feb 21, 2007 1:12 pm

Actually, they use avocado OIL (if I recall), not whole avocado. I actually contacted the company with that very question. I think I posted the answer I received from them on another thread a while ago on this board.
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